Rating:

three_emperors_covReviewed by Caleb Shadis

The Three Emperors is the 7th book in the Ethan Gage series. The only other Gage book I’ve read is #5, The Emerald Storm. I REALLY liked the 7th book a lot more than the 5th. I think it was primarily how the 5th book ended that turned me off–it didn’t seem to quite fit with the feel of the rest of the book. From what I can tell the next (6th) book has a secret that is revealed that sort of makes up for the poor ending.

Ethan is a man who has more things happen to him, both good and bad, than could ever happen to a normal person. His luck gets him into the worst sorts of trouble and just as often saves him from permanent loses. He seems to be a Mr. Magoo crossed with Indiana Jones. Often to hilarious effect.

In this episode of how to find priceless treasure and still be poor, we find Ethan has survived a naval battle between Napoleon’s navy and the British with Nelson at the helm. He has hitched rides on boats until he has washed up on the shores of Venice with a little gold to his name and a clue that his wife might be held hostage in Bohemia. He needs more money and better clues so he can be reunited with his wife and child. Like most of his plans, they never go quite as smooth as they should.

First, he is cheated out of what little money he has managed to collect gambling with the rich. Then, after barely escaping with his life, he runs into an old ‘friend’ who commandeers him back into Napoleon’s forces. It is rather inconvenient when trying to find a missing family. He seems to always jump out of the frying pan into the fire.

Overall, I really enjoyed this book–much to my surprise. After reading The Emerald Storm I wasn’t really impressed and thought it was just OK. I did, however, think it was good enough to give the series at least one more chance, and I am glad I did. The Three Emperors (in my opinion) was much better and worth a read.

Rating: ★★★★☆ 

Caleb is a software engineer and amateur woodworker living in southern Minnesota. He has more hobbies than he has time or money for, and enjoys his quiet time reading.

Review copy was provided free of any obligation by Harper. No monetary or any other form of compensation was received.