Rating:

the blue bath book coverReviewed by Lauren Cannavino

Mary Waters-Sayer’s beautiful novel, The Blue Bath, is an intimate look into a life of love, memories, searching, passion and betrayal. Kat Lind is an American living in London, raising a small son while her husband, Johnathan, manages their very successful business, usually from very far away. Kat quietly seems to be looking for something as the novel begins, having just lost her mother and planning large scale renovations at her home, but it’s not clear just what she is seeking. The novel begins with a bit of a restless feel, that perfectly sets up the story. Kat is on the treadmill watching the BBC, when her past literally flashes before her eyes on the television screen. Her ex-lover, Daniel Blake, is now a famous artist with a show opening in London.

The Blue Bath skips back and forth between Kat’s time as a student in Paris, where she meets Daniel, then a struggling young artist and details how the two fell in love. These glimpses of Paris are mixed into the present during Kat’s comfortable life, throwing her seemingly stable self into a tailspin as the book moves along. It almost seems that Kat slinks along the side of her own life, waiting and watching to see what move should be made next or how the move she did make, can crumble everything she has. When she decides to attend Daniel’s show, she quickly sees herself as the subject of most of the collection and again, finds herself drawn to Daniel and all that time spent in Paris, in spite of her current circumstances. Throughout much of the novel, Kat does not seem to give much thought to her circumstances and when she does, it only comes across as self-serving. Passion, love, deception and discovery are not lacking in the novel and the story is deep, a little twisted at times and will have the reader following along with Kat’s every move, each leading her to right where she ultimately brought herself.

Author Mary Waters-Sayer has a clear voice and well developed characters that make this tale of star-crossed lovers, choices and more really shine. The ending was completely unexpected and she did an excellent job of joining the past with the present. This is an interesting, not run of the mill love story that has just the right amount of darkness and deception thrown in.


Lauren Cannavino is a graduate student, freelance writer, wine lover, and avid reader. Random musings can be found over at www.goldiesays.wordpress.com.

Review copy was provided free of any obligation by St. Martin’s Press. No monetary or any other form of compensation was received.