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lumby lines book coverReviewed by Poppy Johnson

Gail Fraser’s The Lumby Lines is a warm story about acceptance and tolerance in a small Northwestern community. The Lumby Lines is actually the name of a town newspaper, and it highlights the latest gossip and news in the small town of Lumby. A married couple, Mark and Pam Walker decide to leave the city life and move to Lumby, where they find and fall in love with a property that used to be an old Abbey. The Montis Abbey was a monastery in 1893, but has since gone to disrepair. Pam has plans to restore the property to make it into an inn, and her husband Mark agrees with the plan.

Unfortunately, the town is not as accepting of the couple’s intentions. The Lumby Lines begins publishing gossip and news that the proposed inn will not be good for the town, in an effort to turn the residents against the couple. The town government is sharply influenced by the Beezer family and they have a say in what does and doesn’t happen within the town borders. But the Beezer family has its own secrets that the townsfolk will or will not tolerate coming to light, and the story does square them all in the end for the reader.

The idea that a couple would move to a small town and want to turn a historic property into a profitable inn is not a new one. But The Lumby Lines is fresh and fun to read. The story shows that people want to get along, and in Lumby, they want to find a way to bury the past in a literal and figurative way, and get on with their lives. Each time the Walkers are thwarted by the town, for not pulling the proper permits, or for not having a business plan sent to the town council, the reader finds that there are people who step up to help the couple at every turn.

I highly recommend reading The Lumby Lines, which is first in a series of Lumby stories.

After a decade of working in several NYC law departments and teaching, Poppy decided she enjoyed writing full-time. She currently works as a freelance writing consultant, and lives with her husband and sons on the East Coast.

This book was provided free of any obligation by FSB Media. No monetary or any other form of compensation was received.