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51wBXoWn7qL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Reviewed by Carrie Ardoin

Surrounded By Sharks is the first book I’ve ever read that had anything to do with frightening sea creatures, but upon reading the synopsis of this book I was excited to give it a shot. Sharks have become a well-known symbol in pop culture, with the culmination of the much anticipated Shark Week series that the Discovery Channel showcases every year.

In Surrounded by Sharks, by young adult author Michael Northrop, the main character is indeed in the middle of a number of the predators. But to me, the more immediate danger would have been not the animals, but any number of other things that could have killed the boy: exposure, exhaustion, thirst, and above all, drowning. Whatever antagonism Davey experiences, Surrounded by Sharks is a thrilling novel that is sure to keep teenagers engaged with its danger and suspense.

The book starts off a bit slowly, but once the main character disappears, everything moves quickly. Davey is a thirteen-year-old boy on vacation with his family on a tiny private island resort in Florida. A smart and deeply private boy, he is less than thrilled that he has to share one room with his little brother and parents. On the first day of their vacation, Davey wakes up early and decides to take a walk around the resort to try to find a quiet reading spot. He finds that spot in a hidden beach cove, but he decides to ignore the “No Swimming” sign and wades into the ocean a little anyway. Before he can do anything, he is swept away by the waves and ends up drifting more than two miles away from shore.

Davey’s younger brother Brandon had noticed he was gone from the hotel room not long after he left, but he didn’t inform his parents of this immediately.

Probably the main thing that irritated me about the plot of the book is that there were so many mix ups, mistakes, and missed opportunities that I felt like Davey could have been rescued much sooner. I understand that this writing technique is a plot device to make younger readers feel more of a sense of danger and urgency, but for an adult who can put this book away in just a couple of hours, it’s more annoying than anything.

As I said before, the sharks are present in the book, but for myself I didn’t feel like they were as menacing as the author intended them to be. Up until the last couple of chapters  the sharks just swim in circles below Davey. It seems they are nothing but curious about him; however, readers know it is highly unlikely that any person could survive surrounded by sharks for a long period of time.  To a thirteen-year-old kid lost in the vast sea, though, the motivation of the sharks is meaningless—the child just wants to survive the ordeal.

I think middle grade readers will enjoy this read; it is split up into short, easy–to-read chapters and often the chapters end on a menacing note. I also believe it might make the kids who read it think twice about the consequences before they break any rules!

Rating: ★★★½☆ 

Carrie runs the blog Sweet Southern Home, and is a stay at home wife and mom to one little boy. When she’s not reading, she’s usually watching Netflix with her husband, playing outside with her son, or baking. Her family would describe her as sometimes annoyingly sarcastic, but mostly lovable. 

Review copy was provided free of any obligation by Scholastic Press. No monetary or any other form of compensation was received.