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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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7 01, 2017

Review: Confessions of a Wedding Musician Mom by Jennifer McCoy Blaske

By | January 7th, 2017|Categories: Comedy, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , |4 Comments

Rating:

wedding musician mom book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

I wanted to like Confessions of a Wedding Musician Mom. Really, I did. I love classical music and it has been a major part of my long life. I knew I was in trouble, however, on page 15 as the female protagonist opened her ‘yellow Schemer edition of Chopin’s preludes’. Every piano or other music student would immediately recognize a Schirmer’s Library edition, with the black scroll work on its yellow cover.

Against my better judgement, I persisted in continuing to read. I actually  made it to page 63 of 189, before abandoning the project. What an abysmal mess! Eegads. 

6 01, 2017

Review: The Possibility of Somewhere by Julia Day

By | January 6th, 2017|Categories: Children's Books, Love & Romance, Young Adult|Tags: , , |3 Comments

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possibility of somewhere book coverReviewed by Meg Massey

Eden Moore is on track to become the valedictorian of her high school class, despite the fact that she’s grown up in a trailer park with her often out-of-work father and stepmother. Since her birth mother left her when she was just a child, Eden’s only ever had one goal: to leave her small town and life there behind.

Her classmate Ash Gupta has never quite understood how Eden, with her sharp and sarcastic nature, could possibly become valedictorian. But when the two of them are thrown together to complete a class assignment, they begin to get to know each other for the first time, and Ash recognizes her intelligence and depth.

5 01, 2017

Giveaway: Life Word by Jon Gordon, Dan Britton, and Jimmy Page

By | January 5th, 2017|Categories: Giveaways|Tags: |4 Comments

life word book coverEnter to win a copy of Life Word: Discover Your One Word to Leave a Legacy by by Jon Gordon, Dan Britton, and Jimmy Page! Open to US residents only

About the book

In One Word that will Change your Life authors Jon Gordon, Dan Britton, and Jimmy Page helped readers discover their yearly word to live with more intention, focus and purpose. Now with Life Word they help readers discover a word that will significantly impact their life and legacy.

Life Word reveals a simple, powerful tool to help you identify the word that will inspire you to live your best life while leaving your greatest legacy. In the process you’ll discover your why which will help show you the way to live with a renewed sense of power, purpose and passion.

4 01, 2017

Review: Paris for One by Jojo Moyes

By | January 4th, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction, Romance, Short Stories, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |3 Comments

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paris for one book coverReviewed by Christen Krumm

Jojo Moyes follows the releases of Me Before You and After You with a collection of short stories that are sure to please. Paris for One is perfect for that time when you want to sit down and enjoy a story or two, but have no time for a full length novel.

“Paris for One”, the cornerstone of the book, is a different coming of age story. Nell, our main character, is twenty-six and is living life in a bubble. She is the over cautious, never adventurous girl (unless you count that annual weekend with her girlfriends) who decides to step outside her comfort zone and plan a romantic getaway to Paris with her boyfriend.

3 01, 2017

Review: We Could Be Beautiful by Swan Huntley

By | January 3rd, 2017|Categories: Literary, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |6 Comments

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we could be beautiful book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

When I read the synopsis for We Could Be Beautiful by Swan Huntley, I had high expectations. I was expecting an entrancing psychological thriller with intriguing characters and a lot of twists and turns. Unfortunately, this book did not deliver any of that.

Catherine West, a rich woman who has spent her life among all things beautiful, now lives in Manhattan and owns her own card store, Leaf. However, under her prim and proper exterior is a woman with two broken engagements, a mother with Alzheimer’s, a sister who she has nothing in common with, and the longing to be a mother.

3 01, 2017

Review: You Will Not Have My Hate by Antoine Leiris

By | January 3rd, 2017|Categories: Death & Grief, Health, Mind, & Body, Memoirs, Nonfiction, Parenting & Family|Tags: , , , |5 Comments

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you will not have my hate book coverReviewed by Marcus Hammond

In 2015, terrorists attacked six different sites in Paris, killing 130 people. A large number of those victims came from the Bataclan Theater, where Helene Muyal-Leiris was attending a concert. While there were survivors of the attack on the Bataclan, Helene was not among that number. With Helene’s death, Antoine Leiris lost his wife and the mother of his child. It is this tragic loss and Antoine’s struggle to move forward that serves as a backdrop for the raw, powerful emotions that are portrayed throughout the beautiful, heart-wrenching You Will Not Have My Hate.

The memoir is structured in short, conversational passages that begin on the night of the attack and end two weeks later. Antoine details everything from his initial concern and then panic on the night of the attacks, to the deep sorrow, desire for isolation, and appreciation for support in the days that followed. Each passage builds a portrait of a man who lost half his heart, but recognized the need to remain strong to raise his son, Melvil.

2 01, 2017

Review: The After Party by Jana Prikryl

By | January 2nd, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction, Poetry|Tags: |2 Comments

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the after party book coverReviewed by Alexander Morrison

Unlike the last book of poetry I reviewed, Christine Heppermann’s Ask Me How I Got Here, Jana Prikryl’s The After Party is not particularly narrative. The last third or so of the book, titled “Thirty Thousand Islands,” has some narrative elements, but for the most part the book is built more around form and language and personal history than plot. While that gives Prikryl a considerable amount of freedom to experiment, it also makes the collection a bit more hit-or-miss on an individual level, prone to wild shifts in subject from moment to moment. But Prikryl is an immensely talented writer, and while I never warmed to every poem in the collection, her wit, imagery, and style unquestionably won me over.

30 12, 2016

Blog Tour: The Golden Son by Shilpi Somaya Gowda

By | December 30th, 2016|Categories: Coming of Age, Cultural Heritage, Genre Fiction, Historical, Literary, Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , , |6 Comments

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the golden son book coverPlease join Shilpi Somaya Gowda, author of The Golden Son, as she tours the blogosphere with TLC Book Tours!

Reviewed by Nina Longfield

In a rural province of India, young Anil Patel witnesses secondhand the miracle of modern medicine when a traveling clinic restores health to a baby girl and faith within the family. Anil is then determined to enter the medical field with his father’s blessings. Anil’s father sees medicine as an honorable calling and encourages his son’s pursuit giving him permission to remain home away from the fields so he can study, which Anil does morning to night.

29 12, 2016

Blog Tour: Marlene by C.W. Gortner

By | December 29th, 2016|Categories: Biographical, Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |2 Comments

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marlene book coverPlease join C.W. Gortner, author of Marlene, as he tours the blogosphere with TLC Book Tours!

Reviewed by Colleen Turner

The Golden Age of Hollywood has always held a unique fascination for me, with so much glamour and mystery surrounding the lives of the various players that just begs to be explored. Given this I had a vague idea of who Marlene Dietrich was even if I didn’t know much about her personal life. After reading and enjoying a number of books by author C.W. Gortner I did know, however, that I was in for a treat and was bound to learn a great deal in the process. What I didn’t expect was to discover such a rare and remarkable woman that is truly beyond compare.

28 12, 2016

Review: My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout

By | December 28th, 2016|Categories: Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |4 Comments

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my name is lucy barton book coverReviewed by Nina Longfield

My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout is a novel that begins in reflection. The main character, Lucy, is looking back at a time “many years ago” in which she was hospitalized for nine weeks with a mysterious illness. At that time, she was weak and growing weaker. Her one constant was the view from her hospital bed of the Chrysler Building. In the daytime, the building seemed to recede, another gray silhouette surround by gray, but at night, it shown bright giving Lucy hope in her darkness.

Lucy’s story is about loneliness and isolation. Even surrounded by family, she seems to be alone. Lucy wakes in her hospital room some days after being admitted to find her mother sitting in the chair at the foot of her bed.