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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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13 05, 2016

Review: Unstuffed by Ruth Soukup

By | May 13th, 2016|Categories: Christian Living, Hobbies & Home, How To & Home Improvements, Nonfiction, Religion & Spirituality|Tags: , , , , |1 Comment

Rating:

unstuffed book coverReviewed by Poppy Johnson

I started reading Unstuffed excited that the author would finally tell me how to get rid of my useless piles of junk. While I wasn’t disappointed, I also wasn’t wowed by the advice–to tell the truth, I was underwhelmed. Soukup has a popular one-in-a-million blog and whatnot and definitely knows her stuff (no pun intended), but I didn’t get much from her book that I didn’t already know.

The book has three main sections for decluttering the home, the mind and the soul. In the home section there are lists and tips for decluttering such as placing everything in a box for a month, taking everything off the counters, and keeping a central place to gather stuff  in order to properly organize it later. Well, OK…that would never work in my house but it may be good advice

27 11, 2015

Review: The Witches by Stacy Schiff

By | November 27th, 2015|Categories: Historical, Nonfiction, Religion & Spirituality|Tags: , , |4 Comments

Rating:

the witches salem 1962 book coverReviewed by Alisha Churbe

Schiff’s strength is in narrating history and bringing new light to an old story. The Witches: Salem, 1692 is impeccably researched and it’s dense with historical facts. The book begins with six pages for a “Cast of Characters”. With this, you know right away the book will be intense and you should be prepared for the endeavor. It’s not a quick read and the sheer number of characters made it a difficult read.

Schiff has done a great job retelling the story of the Salem Witch Trials in a new way, adding so much to the story that isn’t available in the history. Schiff’s narration is distant, which is fitting to the subject, but it makes the story hard to get through. Schiff’s retelling adds details and sarcasm that wasn’t necessarily in the historical

1 07, 2015

Blog Tour: Letters from My Father’s Murderer by Laurie A. Coombs

By | July 1st, 2015|Categories: Christian Living, Memoirs, Nonfiction, Religion & Spirituality|Tags: , , |4 Comments

Rating:

my father's murderer book coverPlease join Laurie A. Coombs, author of Letters from My Father’s Murderer, as she tours the blogosphere with Litfuse Publicity!

Reviewed by Sarah McCubbin

Laurie Coombs was an average American girl. Growing up in a loving family, she was surrounded by all that makes family good. Despite her parents’ divorce, she maintained good relationships with both her mother and father and enjoyed spending time with them. But one man’s heated actions changed her life forever. After a great vacation with her father, she and her boyfriend arrived home to discover that something was wrong…dreadfully wrong. Her father was dead. He had been murdered in his own home. The shock brought Laurie’s world to a halt and started her a long journey towards healing that would take many years.

In Laurie’s book, Letters from My Father’s Murderer, she shares

7 06, 2015

Review: A Blessing Well Disguised by Llloyd Burlingame

By | June 7th, 2015|Categories: Memoirs, Nonfiction, Religion & Spirituality|Tags: , |2 Comments

Rating:

blessing well disguised book coverReviewed by Holly Madison

I was first drawn to this book because of its title. I am an artist and can’t imagine what it would be like to suddenly go blind. My business would fail because I would no longer be able to dye wool and yarn for my customers. Equally as important, I would lose the creative outlet that painting gives me… and with it, maybe part of my sanity. I can’t imagine living in a world of darkness.

But this book surprised me by being about so much more than an artist’s lack of sight and how he dealt with it. It is a memoir about a gay man’s struggles to find himself and his place in this world. It is also about answering the author’s  ultimate question, “What good is a blind man?”

Lloyd has had a remarkable

28 05, 2015

Review: Keep It Shut by Karen Ehman

By | May 28th, 2015|Categories: Nonfiction, Religion & Spirituality|Tags: , |2 Comments

Rating:

keep it shut book coverReviewed by Sarah McCubbin

In real life, I’m not a super chatty person, unless there is some kind of opinion involved. In that case, you better look out. I’m pretty sure I’m going to step on toes and stray into less than gracious territory. I could blame it on coming from a family of lawyers and parents that encouraged open ended dialogue; but when it comes down to kind speech or the lack thereof, I’m afraid I really can truly only blame myself. So, when I saw Karen Ehman’s Keep It Shut: What to Say, How to Say It, and When to Say Nothing at All, I knew this book would probably benefit me.

The trouble with speech is that we often speak before we think. It actually takes quite a bit of time to slow down and process

26 05, 2015

Blog Tour: Called to be Amish by Marlene Miller

By | May 26th, 2015|Categories: Memoirs, Nonfiction, Parenting & Family, Religion & Spirituality|Tags: , , |2 Comments

Rating:

called to be amish book coverPlease welcome Marlene Miller, author of Called to be Amish, who is touring the blogosphere with Litfuse Publicity!

Reviewed by Sarah McCubbin

Just a short drive from where we live is a large community of Amish. I’ve always wondered what life is truly like for them. So, my interest was piqued when I saw the book, Called to Be Amish: My Journey from Head Majorette to the Old Order by Marlene Miller. For an English person to join the Amish is exceedingly rare, and for someone to then share that story, even more so. Having lived as both English and Amish, Marlene writes knowing how the other half lives.

When she was growing up, Marlene and her siblings lived with their parents in a small Ohio town. While their home looked ordinary on the outside, it was actually a

28 03, 2015

Review: But God by Herbert Cooper

By | March 28th, 2015|Categories: Christian Living, Health, Mind, & Body, Nonfiction, Religion & Spirituality, Self-Help|Tags: , , |0 Comments

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but good book coverReviewed by Charity Lyman

I frequently read Christian self help books but more often than not I feel like I’ve wasted my time. Typically, it’s a lot of reading with semi-interesting facts that make no difference in my everyday life. These books bring to light areas where one might need to change but don’t give any answers on how to make that change possible. When But God: Changes Everything showed up for review, I almost didn’t even take a second look. But I respect Craig Groeschel (who wrote the foreword) and on that recommendation alone I decided to give it a try. Here are my thoughts on But God by Herbert Cooper.

But God takes the reader through a journey. It is written specifically for those who have tried option after option and yet have made no significant changes in their lives.

13 02, 2015

Review: Vanishing Grace by Philip Yancey

By | February 13th, 2015|Categories: Christian Books & Bibles, Christian Living, Nonfiction, Religion & Spirituality|Tags: , |2 Comments

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vanishing grace book coverReviewed by Alyssa Katanic

What do you think of when you hear the title Evangelical Christian? I suppose that it depends upon whether you consider yourself to be one, know one, or have been helped or hurt by someone who calls him/herself one. In his new book, Vanishing Grace: What Ever Happened to the Good News?, Philip Yancey explores why “Evangelical Christian” can tend to have a negative connotation in post-Christian America and Europe while still being quite a ray of hope for the rest of the world, challenges Christians to examine their lives and ways of reaching out to others, and points out why the Christian faith is so important to the lives of both Believers and unbelievers alike.

In Vanishing Grace I hear the voice of Philip Yancey as a coach during the halftime of an important game:

31 01, 2015

Blog Tour: Choosing Him All Over Again by Juana Mikels

By | January 31st, 2015|Categories: Christian Living, Nonfiction, Religion & Spirituality|Tags: , , |1 Comment

Rating:

choosing him blog tour bannerPlease join Juana Mikels, author of Choosing Him All Over Again, as she tours the blogosphere with Ambassador International!

Reviewed by Sarah McCubbin

On the outside, Juana appeared to have an ideal life. Along with a handsome husband, she had a new house, a great job with a good income and a fun life that most of us would perceive as ideal. But on the inside, she was desperately unhappy and so alone. None of the outward trappings mattered. She was miserable. Convinced that she had married the wrong man, she decided to abandon her marriage, hoping that at some point, she could find a guy that would really make her happy. In her book, Choosing Him All Over Again: A Story of Romance and Redemption, Juana Mikels tells her personal story of her shattered life and the events

14 01, 2015

Review: The Rise of ISIS by Jay Sekulow

By | January 14th, 2015|Categories: Audiobooks, Islam, Nonfiction, Religion & Spirituality, Terrorism|Tags: , , , |12 Comments

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rise of isis book coverReviewed by Sarah McCubbin

Turn on the evening news or click through social media and disturbing images and headlines glare you squarely in the face. Stories of genocide, massacres, bombings and beheadings run alongside the latest weather patterns in the evening news. So much violence, even the edited version, can cause fear and a sense of despair. Discerning truth from fiction must be navigated carefully. So, when we hear stories of ISIS, the latest militant Islamic terrorist group, knowing what to believe can be challenging.

In his book, Rise of ISIS: A Threat We Can’t Ignore, Jay Sekulow presents a solid picture of who these people are, who supports them, the threat they present and what we need to do to prevent their brand of terror from spreading. Much of this book centers on distinguishing ISIS and other terrorist