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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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12 04, 2017

Blog Tour: Extreme You by Sarah Robb O’Hagan

By | April 12th, 2017|Categories: Business & Investing, Health, Mind, & Body, Management & Leadership, Motivation & Self-Improvement, Motivational, Nonfiction, Self-Help, Success|Tags: , , , , , , |4 Comments

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extreme you book coverPlease join Sarah Robb O’Hagan, author of Extreme You, as she tours the blogosphere with TLC Book Tours!

Reviewed by Richard Wisniewski

When I saw the title of this book, I immediately jumped at the opportunity to read it. There is something empowering about reading an empowering book from such an empowering female. Before jumping into this review, I have to say that simply reading the first 30 pages of Sarah Robb O’Hagan’s book motivated me more than ever.

Extreme You is a very simple concept that is often overlooked by millions of people around the world. We live in a culture where many people tend to conform to the societal standards of what is acceptable.

4 04, 2017

Review: At the End of the World by Lawrence Millman

By | April 4th, 2017|Categories: Historical, Nonfiction, Social Sciences|Tags: , , , |3 Comments

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at the end of the world book coverReviewed by Kevin O’Brien

Lawrence Millman’s non-fiction book, At the End of the World: A True Story of Murder in the Arctic, is the latest work from the intrepid traveler. Millman, an award-winning adventure writer, markets his book as a trip north to the Belcher Islands in Hudson Bay to investigate a series of murders in the early 1940s.

The book touches upon a religious frenzy that led several Inuit on the Belcher Islands to murder nine others. A meteor shower in 1941 resulted in some of the Inuit in the area to fear that the world was ending. The local shaman and one of the best hunters in the tribe then stylized themselves as deities, killing anyone they denounced as Satanic. The case eventually resulted in a massive investigation and trial.

1 04, 2017

Review: Online Marketing for Busy Authors by Fauzia Burke

By | April 1st, 2017|Categories: Business & Investing, Nonfiction, Reference|Tags: , , , |1 Comment

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online marketing for busy authors book coverReviewed by Poppy Johnson

Fauzia Burke, the author of Online Marketing for Busy Authors, is an entrepreneur herself, who started a digital branding and online publishing house for book authors (many of whom are A-list celebrities and actors). Her book includes tips, call-outs, surveys and questionnaires, advice, ideas and suggestions for anyone interested in promoting a book online. The book goes into details on all aspects of book promotion, and covers all online tools necessary for getting the word out about your work product (such as Google Analysis, Facebook, Twitter, etc.).

Burke discusses the three phases of online marketing for authors. The first phase is becoming organized and developing a personal brand, knowing your goals and learning business priorities.

30 03, 2017

Review: A World Elsewhere by Sigrid MacRae

By | March 30th, 2017|Categories: Historical, Memoirs, Nonfiction|Tags: , , |3 Comments

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a world elsewhere book coverReviewed by Sarah McCubbin

Boxes hold a curious fascination. Whether made of cardboard or plastic or inlayed wood, most of the time, they contain the mundane…items left from moving, old clothes or files of papers important at some point in our lives. A box with a key though, that is a mystery waiting to be discovered. We wonder with rapt anticipation what adventure waits upon its unlocking. In her book, A World Elsewhere: An American Woman in Wartime Germany, author Sigrid Macrae takes us on a real life journey that began with such a box and unlocks the questions held in her own life that the contents answer. Upon receiving a locked Moroccan box from her mother, Sigrid finds that when it is finally opened, it reveals the answers to her early years, details about her deceased father whom she never knew and the opportunity to make peace with her past.

29 03, 2017

Blog Tour: Dishing Up the Dirt by Andrea Bemis

By | March 29th, 2017|Categories: Cooking, Food, Wine, For the Cook, Gift Ideas, Nonfiction|Tags: , |5 Comments

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dishing up the dirt book coverPlease join Andrea Bemis, author of Dishing Up the Dirt, as she tours the blogosphere with TLC Book Tours!

Reviewed by Sara Dalton

I love new book day. When my books arrive for review, I take some time to sit and open the envelope and revel in each title.  This book came all by itself but I took as much time as I would have for three books. The first thing I noticed after opening it was the texture of the pages. It was not what I expected but it’s exactly what was needed. Though this book is well bound and has gorgeous, full color illustrations on almost every page, they are not slick and glossy. The feel of the pages is perfect for this book. Dishing up the Dirt is written by Andrea Bemis and she, along with her husband, is a farmer. Farming is not an easy life of leisure that will leave you with baby soft hands and clean fingernails. Feeling my baby soft hands rasp over the pages of the book gave me a tangible connection to the author. It felt like a friendly handshake. 

20 03, 2017

Review: Winning with Money by Aaron Coleman

By | March 20th, 2017|Categories: Business & Investing, Health, Mind, & Body, Nonfiction, Personal Finance, Self-Help, Success|Tags: , , , , |1 Comment

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winning with money book coverReviewed by Richard Wisniewski

Money can be an extremely sensitive topic for people. This can be partly attributed to the negative connotation of money due to social conditioning. Now, in many cases, those who attribute a negative connotation towards money often lack one of the most vital tools in the world to ‘Win with Money’: a budget. This message is at the core of Aaron Coleman’s book, Winning with Money: Simplify Your Financial Life.

Coleman puts forth that there are dozens of different budgetary techniques in the world and, for many people, they often haven’t found one that works. In fact, many people often complain that they are living paycheck to paycheck or finding themselves struggling with debt. Through a proper monetary budgeting plan, one can easily take control of their life and begin to see the numbers

16 03, 2017

Review: The Best Grain-Free Family Meals on the Planet by Laura Fuentes

By | March 16th, 2017|Categories: Cooking, Food, Wine, Nonfiction|Tags: , |7 Comments

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best grain free family meals book coverReviewed by Sarah Dalton

When I received The Best Grain-Free Family Meals on the Planet, the first thing I did was leaf through it and look at all the gorgeous, full color pictures of the recipes. This is a beautiful book and the pages are sturdy enough to hold up to being moved around and used in a kitchen where they might get spilled or splattered on. My kids also thought the pictures were fabulous and asked to eat some of their favorite looking dishes. The saying goes, “You eat with your eyes first”.

I did something with this book I have not done with many cookbooks before. I read it cover to cover. Part of that was so I could give it a thorough review, but part of it was because Laura Fuentes did include a small story or description about each recipe, along with possible modifications for dealing with specific food needs.

10 03, 2017

Review: The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking

By | March 10th, 2017|Categories: Happiness, Health, Mind, & Body, Nonfiction, Personal Health, Religion & Spirituality, Self-Help|Tags: , , , , |5 Comments

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The Little Book of Hygge book coverReviewed by Richard Wisniewski

Happiness. That word brings forth millions upon millions of thoughts within seconds. When you ask people what the meaning of life may be to them, many say happiness. If you ask them for their personal goals, they say happiness. Everyone, to some degree, is pointing towards happiness. With that being said, every year, numerous reports deliver research on the happiest countries in the world. Each and every year, the Danes end up taking the cake. (If you read this book, you will get the pun).

The Little Book of Hygge is quite the fascinating book as it offers great insight into the cultural belief system of the Danish people.

7 03, 2017

Review: Drop In by Sara Harvey Yao

By | March 7th, 2017|Categories: Business & Investing, Health, Mind, & Body, Management & Leadership, Nonfiction, Self-Help|Tags: , , |2 Comments

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drop in book coverReviewed by Richard Wisniewski

In 2017, social conditioning has programmed a society into a state of complete distraction. While many may have resistance to this notion, it’s true. In so many cases, people have complicated their lives to a place where complications, complexities, busyness, and stress seem normal. In fact, for some corrupt reason, people actually value their self-worth as a worker by how much stress they have. And these complexities of life and the constant state of busyness have caused people to, by default, stay in auto-pilot mode, as Sara Harvey Yao describes. Drop In: Lead with Deeper Presence and Courage is the perfect book for anyone seeking to truly focus on the here and now. 

7 03, 2017

Review: Mincemeat by Leonardo Lucarelli

By | March 7th, 2017|Categories: Cooking, Food, Wine, Memoirs, Nonfiction|Tags: , |3 Comments

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mincemeat book coverReviewed by Kate Schefer

Leonardo Lucarelli has always liked to cook. His father was an exceptional cook, but passed away young. His mother tried, but could never make anything that transcended the merely edible. As a teen, Leo spent free afternoons at home cooking for himself and friends; he realized he was good, but never considered it more than a useful skill. When he received a scholarship to study in Rome, he jumped at the opportunity to leave his home in the country; when that scholarship covered little more than his books, he walked into a restaurant kitchen and asked for a job. So began “the education of an Italian chef,” the subtitle of Lucarelli’s illuminating autobiography, Mincemeat.