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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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20 03, 2017

Review: Winning with Money by Aaron Coleman

By | March 20th, 2017|Categories: Business & Investing, Health, Mind, & Body, Nonfiction, Personal Finance, Self-Help, Success|Tags: , , , , |1 Comment

Rating:

winning with money book coverReviewed by Richard Wisniewski

Money can be an extremely sensitive topic for people. This can be partly attributed to the negative connotation of money due to social conditioning. Now, in many cases, those who attribute a negative connotation towards money often lack one of the most vital tools in the world to ‘Win with Money’: a budget. This message is at the core of Aaron Coleman’s book, Winning with Money: Simplify Your Financial Life.

Coleman puts forth that there are dozens of different budgetary techniques in the world and, for many people, they often haven’t found one that works. In fact, many people often complain that they are living paycheck to paycheck or finding themselves struggling with debt. Through a proper monetary budgeting plan, one can easily take control of their life and begin to see the numbers

16 03, 2017

Review: The Best Grain-Free Family Meals on the Planet by Laura Fuentes

By | March 16th, 2017|Categories: Cooking, Food, Wine, Nonfiction|Tags: , |6 Comments

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best grain free family meals book coverReviewed by Sarah Dalton

When I received The Best Grain-Free Family Meals on the Planet, the first thing I did was leaf through it and look at all the gorgeous, full color pictures of the recipes. This is a beautiful book and the pages are sturdy enough to hold up to being moved around and used in a kitchen where they might get spilled or splattered on. My kids also thought the pictures were fabulous and asked to eat some of their favorite looking dishes. The saying goes, “You eat with your eyes first”.

I did something with this book I have not done with many cookbooks before. I read it cover to cover. Part of that was so I could give it a thorough review, but part of it was because Laura Fuentes did include a small story or description about each recipe, along with possible modifications for dealing with specific food needs.

10 03, 2017

Review: The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking

By | March 10th, 2017|Categories: Happiness, Health, Mind, & Body, Nonfiction, Personal Health, Religion & Spirituality, Self-Help|Tags: , , , , |4 Comments

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The Little Book of Hygge book coverReviewed by Richard Wisniewski

Happiness. That word brings forth millions upon millions of thoughts within seconds. When you ask people what the meaning of life may be to them, many say happiness. If you ask them for their personal goals, they say happiness. Everyone, to some degree, is pointing towards happiness. With that being said, every year, numerous reports deliver research on the happiest countries in the world. Each and every year, the Danes end up taking the cake. (If you read this book, you will get the pun).

The Little Book of Hygge is quite the fascinating book as it offers great insight into the cultural belief system of the Danish people.

7 03, 2017

Review: Drop In by Sara Harvey Yao

By | March 7th, 2017|Categories: Business & Investing, Health, Mind, & Body, Management & Leadership, Nonfiction, Self-Help|Tags: , , |2 Comments

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drop in book coverReviewed by Richard Wisniewski

In 2017, social conditioning has programmed a society into a state of complete distraction. While many may have resistance to this notion, it’s true. In so many cases, people have complicated their lives to a place where complications, complexities, busyness, and stress seem normal. In fact, for some corrupt reason, people actually value their self-worth as a worker by how much stress they have. And these complexities of life and the constant state of busyness have caused people to, by default, stay in auto-pilot mode, as Sara Harvey Yao describes. Drop In: Lead with Deeper Presence and Courage is the perfect book for anyone seeking to truly focus on the here and now. 

7 03, 2017

Review: Mincemeat by Leonardo Lucarelli

By | March 7th, 2017|Categories: Cooking, Food, Wine, Memoirs, Nonfiction|Tags: , |3 Comments

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mincemeat book coverReviewed by Kate Schefer

Leonardo Lucarelli has always liked to cook. His father was an exceptional cook, but passed away young. His mother tried, but could never make anything that transcended the merely edible. As a teen, Leo spent free afternoons at home cooking for himself and friends; he realized he was good, but never considered it more than a useful skill. When he received a scholarship to study in Rome, he jumped at the opportunity to leave his home in the country; when that scholarship covered little more than his books, he walked into a restaurant kitchen and asked for a job. So began “the education of an Italian chef,” the subtitle of Lucarelli’s illuminating autobiography, Mincemeat.

6 03, 2017

Review: Gizelle’s Bucket List by Lauren Fern Watt

By | March 6th, 2017|Categories: Animals, Memoirs, Nonfiction, Travel|Tags: , , |3 Comments

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gizelle's bucket list book coverReviewed by Sarah Dalton

Gizelle’s Bucket List was a fun, fast read. I laughed, a lot. OK, right up until I needed tissues and a couple days away from the book for my mental health. The story centers on Lauren (Fernie) and Gizelle, her 160 pound Mastiff. Woven around this central pillar are ribbons of side story about family dynamics, friendships, adventure, boyfriends, love (or at least like), loss, self-discovery, and slobber. Lots and lots of slobber. Actually, there is really only one story about slobber. It’s not bad.

We get to be with Fernie when, at the behest of her Mother, she finds, falls in love with, and brings home Gizelle. Leave to get doughnuts, come home with a giant breed puppy.

25 02, 2017

Review: The F*ck It List by Kevin Pryslak

By | February 25th, 2017|Categories: Entertainment, Health, Mind, & Body, Humor, Nonfiction, Self-Help|Tags: , , |5 Comments

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fuck it list book coverReviewed by Poppy Johnson

Let’s start with the facts–The F*ck It List: All The Things You Can Skip Before You Die is hilarious. We all despise other people’s glorious tales about the exciting to them but boring to us travels, their “this or that” some friend just purchased, or the Lifetime Achievement goals someone else just achieved. Who needs it, the having to be happy for other people for their trumped up triumphs? Who needs a bucket list anyway and why do we need to list all of the crap that we will likely never achieve or be able to afford in our average lives?

Kevin Pryslak flows the idea of a formalized, notarized “Bucket List” that can be promptly thrown out the window, or alternatively, in the toilet. And man, it definitely felt good to do this and take my life back–to get rid of the expectations and the “scores” to exceed.

23 02, 2017

Review: The Gratitude Diaries by Janice Kaplan

By | February 23rd, 2017|Categories: Happiness, Health, Mind, & Body, Memoirs, Nonfiction, Self-Help|Tags: , , |5 Comments

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the gratitude diaries book coverReviewed by Richard Wisniewski

I came across The Gratitude Diaries by Janice Kaplan one day as I was doing personal research for my book on the topic. Upon reading the introduction to the New York Times bestselling book, I was captivated, intrigued and sold. Now, I do not say this quite often at all. I firmly believe that every single human being walking on planet Earth should read this book. It is not only life-transformative, it’s life-enlightening.

The concept of The Gratitude Diaries was an idea that came to Kaplan on New Year’s Eve. With the hustle and bustle of society, especially in New York City, Kaplan made it her personal resolution to dedicate 365 days to gratitude and appreciation. Rather than finding fault in things the way so many people do, Kaplan’s intention was to see the silver lining and the bright side of everything.

22 02, 2017

Review: Groovin’ by Rich Israel

By | February 22nd, 2017|Categories: Memoirs, Nonfiction, Travel|Tags: , |2 Comments

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groovin' book coverReviewed by Lauren Cannavino

Rich Israel’s playful, bright and fantastical memoir of the 1960’s experience is a fun, well-written read for fans of counterculture and coming-of-age tales. Groovin’: Horses, Hopes, and Slippery Slopes is raucous, trippy and expressive, full of adventure, hijinks and personal discoveries. From hitchhiking, to a month long horseback riding adventure out west, Rich takes the reader through a time that many can only read about and others will remember fondly.

The book reminded me of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, full of crazy characters, road trips, adventures and drugs, but peppered with self- reflection, excellent insight and the running political commentary in the background.

19 02, 2017

Review: Economics Rules by Dani Rodrik

By | February 19th, 2017|Categories: Business & Investing, Economics, Nonfiction|Tags: , , |3 Comments

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economics rules book coverReviewed by Alexander Morrison

A lot of energy is spent every election season arguing about the economy. Sure, there are plenty of political issues, but most of them are pretty simple. They’re beliefs. But economics is a science, even if, as it is subtitled in Dani Rodrik’s new book, it is sometimes called ‘the dismal science’. We all want everyone to have a good job, to make a living they can raise a family with, to be able to afford a home and other basic necessities, but knowing how to make that happen? That’s considerably more difficult. Oftentimes, we resort to ‘common sense’ solutions, only to find them blowing up in our faces time and time again. That’s because, as Rodrik’s Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science makes abundantly clear, economies are vast, complex things that often resist the obvious solutions. Thankfully, Rodrik’s book is meant to give a basic primer on how economists operate, what kinds of mistakes economists make, and what it all means for you.