Rating:

When I first started this blog, I used to do a feature called Friday Cravings. I am a self-proclaimed book hoarder! Regardless of how many books I already have or how overflowing my bookshelves are, I am always on the look out for that next great read or that undiscovered gem of a book. That’s where Friday Cravings comes in: although I find new must-haves almost every day(!), I’ll limit sharing my picks to Friday and try (very hard) to pick just one book. I think this will also be a great way for us to discover some older and maybe overlooked books and not focus on just the shiny new releases.

Have a book that you’re craving to add to your collection? I’d love to hear from you! Just leave a comment here. And if anyone has read the book below, please let me know what you thought.

 

Pick of the Week – Mistress of the Revolution by Catherine DeLors

Found: I am fortunate to live in a city that has one of the best library systems in the country: Cuyahoga County Public Library. Recently, on their Facebook page, they asked folks to list the last three books they read. In exchange, they’d give you suggestions for similar books you might also enjoy. Mistress of the Revolution was one of the books they suggested for me…and I’m in love! (Psst…it’s also bargain priced on Amazon)

Publisher’s Description

Set in opulent, decadent, turbulent revolutionary France, Mistress of the Revolution is the story of Gabrielle de Montserrat. An impoverished noblewoman blessed with fiery red hair and a mischievous demeanor, Gabrielle is only fifteen when she meets her true love, a commoner named Pierre-André Coffinhal. But her brother forbids their union, choosing for her instead an aging, wealthy baron.

Widowed and a mother while still a teen, Gabrielle arrives at the court of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette in time to be swept up in the emerging cataclysm. As a new order rises, Gabrielle finds her own lovely neck on the chopping block—and who should be selected to sit on the Revolutionary Tribunal but her first love, Pierre-André. . . .