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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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8 02, 2017

Review: Necessary Madness by Jenn Crowell

By | February 8th, 2017|Categories: Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , |2 Comments

Rating:

necessary madness book coverReviewed by Jessa Larsen

Gloria Burgess’s seemingly perfect world comes to an abrupt end when her husband of nine years dies of leukemia. Alone in London, she struggles to cope with her grief whilst trying to successfully raise her young son. She battles the temptation to sink into the same self-absorbed world that drove her own father to suicide.

In Necessary Madness, author Jenn Crowell (who also wrote Etched on Me) takes a look at the mental stability of Gloria after the death of her husband, Bill. Crowell explores the long argued nature vs. nurture–Gloria both blames her parents for her current state of being and hopes that she is not a mimicry of either parent. Whilst dealing with the grief of losing her husband, she wonders if she will be doomed to repeat the damage caused by her own father. 

30 01, 2017

Review: Traveling Light by Lynne Branard

By | January 30th, 2017|Categories: Humor & Entertainment, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , |4 Comments

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traveling light book coverReviewed by Jennifer Jensen

When Alissa discovers the ashes of a man named Roger Hart in a storage unit she impulsively purchases, it becomes the start of an incredible journey across the country with her three-legged dog Casserole, a teenage waitress named Blossom, and the people they meet on their travels to starting a new life.

Life is messy and there are often very few happy endings, as Lynne Branard heartbreakingly documents in Traveling Light. Alissa is easy to relate to; she’s stuck in her current existence, not really knowing what direction she wants to go. Her father wants her to take over the family business, and she’s not sure she wants it, but it is all she knows. Blossom is wise for her age, and has experienced so much more in her life than Alissa has in her own. Blossom challenges her to take risks, open closed doors, and begin an honest dialogue between herself and her family.

26 01, 2017

Review: The Road to Enchantment by Kaya McLaren

By | January 26th, 2017|Categories: Coming of Age, Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |7 Comments

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road to enchantment book coverReviewed by Meg Massey

When she was a child, Willow’s father cheated on her mother and left their family in shambles. She and her mother moved to New Mexico, where she felt like an outsider among the Apache people. Her only saving grace in her mother’s strange and eccentric new life was Darrel, a young Apache boy who would become her best friend in the world.

Fast forward many years, and Willow is a musician living in Los Angeles. She finds out she’s been dumped, and that her mother has died in a tragic accident on the same horrible day. And when she returns to New Mexico to settle her mother’s affairs and sees Darrel for the first time in years, he realizes before she does that she is pregnant with her ex-boyfriend’s child.

15 01, 2017

Review: Baggage Check by M.J. Pullen

By | January 15th, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , |4 Comments

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baggage check book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

Baggage Check, the third novel in the Marriage Pact series written by M.J. Pullen, is a charming novel about frenemy Rebecca’s journey to happily-ever-after.

Rebecca, 35, is surrounded by happy couples at work and in her circle of friends. Jake, her crush, has just married her friend Marci, and with no idea how to move on, she has made a comfortable life as a flight attendant. With the ability to travel to exotic locations, one would think Rebecca’s life would be full of adventure; however, she spends most of her time off in different hotel rooms around the world much to her friends’ dismay.

8 01, 2017

Review: The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan

By | January 8th, 2017|Categories: Comedy, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |5 Comments

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bookshop on the corner book coverReviewed by Jennifer Jensen

After life throws a curve ball at Nina’s professional career, she finds herself carving out a new path. On an impulse, Nina purchases an old van and transforms it into a mobile bookshop. Nina sets out with a new career in a small Scottish town, making connections with people through book recommendations and exploring new romantic relationships in Jenny Colgan’s The Bookshop on the Corner.

Nina was a character I could easily identify with; I’ve held jobs at two different bookstores, a library, and now I freelance edit for independent authors. Stocking a small van with books that I’m passionate about and sharing them with eager readers seems like it would be rather enjoyable.

4 01, 2017

Review: Paris for One by Jojo Moyes

By | January 4th, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction, Romance, Short Stories, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |3 Comments

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paris for one book coverReviewed by Christen Krumm

Jojo Moyes follows the releases of Me Before You and After You with a collection of short stories that are sure to please. Paris for One is perfect for that time when you want to sit down and enjoy a story or two, but have no time for a full length novel.

“Paris for One”, the cornerstone of the book, is a different coming of age story. Nell, our main character, is twenty-six and is living life in a bubble. She is the over cautious, never adventurous girl (unless you count that annual weekend with her girlfriends) who decides to step outside her comfort zone and plan a romantic getaway to Paris with her boyfriend.

3 01, 2017

Review: We Could Be Beautiful by Swan Huntley

By | January 3rd, 2017|Categories: Literary, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |6 Comments

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we could be beautiful book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

When I read the synopsis for We Could Be Beautiful by Swan Huntley, I had high expectations. I was expecting an entrancing psychological thriller with intriguing characters and a lot of twists and turns. Unfortunately, this book did not deliver any of that.

Catherine West, a rich woman who has spent her life among all things beautiful, now lives in Manhattan and owns her own card store, Leaf. However, under her prim and proper exterior is a woman with two broken engagements, a mother with Alzheimer’s, a sister who she has nothing in common with, and the longing to be a mother.

29 12, 2016

Blog Tour: Marlene by C.W. Gortner

By | December 29th, 2016|Categories: Biographical, Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |2 Comments

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marlene book coverPlease join C.W. Gortner, author of Marlene, as he tours the blogosphere with TLC Book Tours!

Reviewed by Colleen Turner

The Golden Age of Hollywood has always held a unique fascination for me, with so much glamour and mystery surrounding the lives of the various players that just begs to be explored. Given this I had a vague idea of who Marlene Dietrich was even if I didn’t know much about her personal life. After reading and enjoying a number of books by author C.W. Gortner I did know, however, that I was in for a treat and was bound to learn a great deal in the process. What I didn’t expect was to discover such a rare and remarkable woman that is truly beyond compare.

28 12, 2016

Review: My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout

By | December 28th, 2016|Categories: Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |5 Comments

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my name is lucy barton book coverReviewed by Nina Longfield

My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout is a novel that begins in reflection. The main character, Lucy, is looking back at a time “many years ago” in which she was hospitalized for nine weeks with a mysterious illness. At that time, she was weak and growing weaker. Her one constant was the view from her hospital bed of the Chrysler Building. In the daytime, the building seemed to recede, another gray silhouette surround by gray, but at night, it shown bright giving Lucy hope in her darkness.

Lucy’s story is about loneliness and isolation. Even surrounded by family, she seems to be alone. Lucy wakes in her hospital room some days after being admitted to find her mother sitting in the chair at the foot of her bed.

19 12, 2016

Blog Tour: You’re the Cream in My Coffee by Jennifer Lamont Leo

By | December 19th, 2016|Categories: Christian Literature & Fiction, Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

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you're the cream in my coffee book coverPlease join Jennifer Lamont Leo, author of You’re the Cream in My Coffee, as she tours the blogosphere with Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours!

Reviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Wow! What a sure-footed debut novel! Furthermore, it’s a book that could be read and enjoyed by anyone–regardless of age or gender or religious beliefs (or non-beliefs.) It’s an entirely unoffensive, enjoyable book. The author says she loves ‘history’ and proves it with her immaculate research. Close your eyes and you can easily imagine you’re in the Chicago of 1928, or in the world-famous glamorous Marshall Field’s Department store.