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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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25 03, 2017

Review: The Last Chance Matinee by Mariah Stewart

By | March 25th, 2017|Categories: Contemporary, Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Series, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |3 Comments

Rating:

last chance matinee book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

‘Blended’ families – you know, the ‘hers’, ‘his’, and ‘ours’ type of familial organization is a fairly recent invention in this country. Especially during the last 50 years or so. But in this story you get a different kind of ‘blended’ family – three daughters of one man, with two different women, and no divorce in the middle. The three daughters meet for the first time as 30-somethings after both Moms and the Dad are all deceased. Talk about a surprise!

Allie and Des are full sisters, Cara is the singleton in the batch. Allie and Cara both had unhappy marriages; Des is still single. They meet in the attorney’s office to go over the terms of the will. All three women did know the attorney as Uncle Pete, however. It seems that Dad (Fritz Hudson) came from a wealthy family in the small town of Hidden Falls, Pennsylvania.

22 03, 2017

Blog Tour: The Roanoke Girls by Amy Engel

By | March 22nd, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |14 Comments

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roanoke girls book coverPlease join Amy Engel, author of The Roanoke Girls, as she tours the blogosphere with TLC Book Tours!

Reviewed by Kate Schefer

Lane Roanoke is weeks shy of 16 when her mother Camilla commits suicide, and Lane can’t help but feel relief. For as long as she could remember, her mother was a volatile, emotional woman who seemed to display her love for Lane in the form of hate and anger. She didn’t speak often of her childhood home, Roanoke, but when she did, she described it as a “nightmare.” Lane will not understand why until she is sent to live with her grandparents and cousin Allegra later that summer, at the family house in Kansas. Located in the country outside of Osage Flats, Roanoke is a massive estate, whose architecture was inspired by every type of house, it seems. Gran built additions after each child, and she had four daughters (who in turn had more daughters); the house, even in its mostly empty state, feels alive, like it’s pulsing with secrets.

14 03, 2017

Review: Sweet Lake by Christine Nolfi

By | March 14th, 2017|Categories: Comedy, Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Series, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , , |3 Comments

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sweet lake book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Hold on to your hats! If you don’t, it’ll surely be blown away by the eccentric batch of nutty older ladies known as the Sirens. (Nothing wrong with being a nutty older lady – I am one myself, after all) but this batch is particularly concerned (read: nosy) and active (read: fantasy-oriented), although their intentions are always good. Their motto is ‘Do kindness in secret’.

The Wayfair is a resort hotel on a lake in Mid-Southern Ohio, having been in the same family since its inception in the previous century. It has been handed down to the only child throughout its history and always a son, as the family was not very prolific until the most recent generation, which has produced a son Freddie, and a daughter Linnie.

12 02, 2017

Review: Small Admissions by Amy Poeppel

By | February 12th, 2017|Categories: Coming of Age, Genre Fiction, Humor & Entertainment, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |2 Comments

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small admissions book coverReviewed by Carrie Ardoin

When Kate Pearson graduated college and was all set to move in with her French boyfriend in Paris, it came as a hard shock when he decided that was the time to break things off with her. In the next months, she fell apart, spending most days on her sofa or bed, going days without showers, and generally being miserable. With the help of her sister and friend Chloe, she finally gets it together enough to land a job at one of New York City’s most prestigious private schools as an admissions officer.

Kate is, at first, quite overwhelmed by a job she’s sure she has no business doing. But meeting these families who would–and do–do anything to get their kids into the perfect school gives her a focus and keeps her busy. Soon Kate is highly invested in her job and slowly but surely getting her life back on track.

10 02, 2017

Review: The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell

By | February 10th, 2017|Categories: Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |3 Comments

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madwoman upstairs book coverReviewed by Nina Longfield

Samantha Whipple is a twenty-year-old first year student at Old College, Oxford. She enters school as something of a celebrity being the final descendant of the famed Bronte family line. Her first year at Oxford proves troubling since she doesn’t work well with others, tends towards her famous father’s reclusiveness, and is charged with solving a family mystery involving her father and his ancestors.

The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell is, in a sense, a late bloomer’s coming of age tale. Samantha Whipple has an attitude that is flippant, fun, annoying, and back to fun. Her cynical nature is difficult to take at times, but it becomes apparent that this is her protection.

8 02, 2017

Review: Necessary Madness by Jenn Crowell

By | February 8th, 2017|Categories: Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , |2 Comments

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necessary madness book coverReviewed by Jessa Larsen

Gloria Burgess’s seemingly perfect world comes to an abrupt end when her husband of nine years dies of leukemia. Alone in London, she struggles to cope with her grief whilst trying to successfully raise her young son. She battles the temptation to sink into the same self-absorbed world that drove her own father to suicide.

In Necessary Madness, author Jenn Crowell (who also wrote Etched on Me) takes a look at the mental stability of Gloria after the death of her husband, Bill. Crowell explores the long argued nature vs. nurture–Gloria both blames her parents for her current state of being and hopes that she is not a mimicry of either parent. Whilst dealing with the grief of losing her husband, she wonders if she will be doomed to repeat the damage caused by her own father. 

30 01, 2017

Review: Traveling Light by Lynne Branard

By | January 30th, 2017|Categories: Humor & Entertainment, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , |4 Comments

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traveling light book coverReviewed by Jennifer Jensen

When Alissa discovers the ashes of a man named Roger Hart in a storage unit she impulsively purchases, it becomes the start of an incredible journey across the country with her three-legged dog Casserole, a teenage waitress named Blossom, and the people they meet on their travels to starting a new life.

Life is messy and there are often very few happy endings, as Lynne Branard heartbreakingly documents in Traveling Light. Alissa is easy to relate to; she’s stuck in her current existence, not really knowing what direction she wants to go. Her father wants her to take over the family business, and she’s not sure she wants it, but it is all she knows. Blossom is wise for her age, and has experienced so much more in her life than Alissa has in her own. Blossom challenges her to take risks, open closed doors, and begin an honest dialogue between herself and her family.

26 01, 2017

Review: The Road to Enchantment by Kaya McLaren

By | January 26th, 2017|Categories: Coming of Age, Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |7 Comments

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road to enchantment book coverReviewed by Meg Massey

When she was a child, Willow’s father cheated on her mother and left their family in shambles. She and her mother moved to New Mexico, where she felt like an outsider among the Apache people. Her only saving grace in her mother’s strange and eccentric new life was Darrel, a young Apache boy who would become her best friend in the world.

Fast forward many years, and Willow is a musician living in Los Angeles. She finds out she’s been dumped, and that her mother has died in a tragic accident on the same horrible day. And when she returns to New Mexico to settle her mother’s affairs and sees Darrel for the first time in years, he realizes before she does that she is pregnant with her ex-boyfriend’s child.

15 01, 2017

Review: Baggage Check by M.J. Pullen

By | January 15th, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , |4 Comments

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baggage check book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

Baggage Check, the third novel in the Marriage Pact series written by M.J. Pullen, is a charming novel about frenemy Rebecca’s journey to happily-ever-after.

Rebecca, 35, is surrounded by happy couples at work and in her circle of friends. Jake, her crush, has just married her friend Marci, and with no idea how to move on, she has made a comfortable life as a flight attendant. With the ability to travel to exotic locations, one would think Rebecca’s life would be full of adventure; however, she spends most of her time off in different hotel rooms around the world much to her friends’ dismay.

8 01, 2017

Review: The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan

By | January 8th, 2017|Categories: Comedy, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |5 Comments

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bookshop on the corner book coverReviewed by Jennifer Jensen

After life throws a curve ball at Nina’s professional career, she finds herself carving out a new path. On an impulse, Nina purchases an old van and transforms it into a mobile bookshop. Nina sets out with a new career in a small Scottish town, making connections with people through book recommendations and exploring new romantic relationships in Jenny Colgan’s The Bookshop on the Corner.

Nina was a character I could easily identify with; I’ve held jobs at two different bookstores, a library, and now I freelance edit for independent authors. Stocking a small van with books that I’m passionate about and sharing them with eager readers seems like it would be rather enjoyable.