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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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20 04, 2017

Blog Tour: Miss You by Kate Eberlen

By | April 20th, 2017|Categories: Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |9 Comments

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miss you by eberlin book coverPlease join Kate Eberlen, author of Miss You, as she tours the blogosphere with TLC Book Tours

Reviewed by Kate Schefer

Tess and Gus are meant for each other. Most modern romantic books will start with an idea like that. However, in Miss You, Eberlen takes the thought a few steps further. What if they really were meant for each other? Destined to meet and fall in love, as evidenced by the myriad ways their lives had intersected ever since their first chance encounters in Florence. They are both eighteen and vacationing in Italy before going away to college. Tess is camping with her best friend Doll, who is almost her opposite: loud, glamorous, boy-crazy, and prone to indulgences. Gus is with his parents, who he’s pretty sure don’t like him, especially not since the death of his brother Ross the winter before. Ross was always more promising: funny, athletic, smart; and Gus is counting down the minutes until they can go home. Tess and Gus run into each other on the last day of their respective vacations, but won’t meet again until they both (independently) return to Tuscany as 34-year-olds.

17 04, 2017

Review: The Expatriates by Janice Y.K. Lee

By | April 17th, 2017|Categories: Contemporary, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |5 Comments

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expatriates book coverReviewed by Lauren Cannavino

Janice Y.K. Lee’s novel, The Expatriates, is a lyrical and close look at the lives of three women living in Hong Kong. While the women do have differences, their stories and lives have strong intersections and Lee’s wonderful storytelling ability blends the stories together smoothly. The novel speaks of three lives on hold while in Hong Kong and the development of the characters, their emotions and their situations, make this a fast, enjoyable read.

Mercy, Margaret and Hilary are in Hong Kong for different reasons, Mercy a former student laden with bad luck and the latter two being wives and/or mothers, in Hong Kong for their husband’s careers.

7 04, 2017

Review: A Bridge Across the Ocean by Susan Meissner

By | April 7th, 2017|Categories: Contemporary, Genre Fiction, Historical, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |5 Comments

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a bridge across the ocean book coverReviewed by Charity Lyman

Have you ever started a book and found yourself unsure of where the author was going to take you? Well, that is where I began my journey through A Bridge Across the Ocean by Susan Meissner. I entered a world of ghosts, intrigue and ethereal people. Believe me, I don’t think I will be the same after reading this book.

The plot bounces back and forth between many different time periods, including present day California, and 1940s Boston, England and France. There are many characters who are a part of the tale, but all are connected in some manner or another. Even if only by the fact that they can see ghosts, or people from other dimensions.

6 04, 2017

Review: My Not So Perfect Life by Sophia Kinsella

By | April 6th, 2017|Categories: Comedy, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |6 Comments

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my not so perfect life book coverReviewed by Meg Massey

Small-town girl Katie Brenner is struggling to make it on her own in London, living in a tiny apartment with strange roommates and struggling to make ends meet. She can’t help but envy her beautiful and put-together boss, Demeter Farlowe. Demeter seems to have it all–the great job, the perfect family and the most beautiful home and clothing. Katie works hard to prove herself to her office mates and to Demeter, and is devastated when Demeter suddenly fires her.

Coincidentally, Katie’s father and stepmother ask for her help in establishing their new glamping vacation business at their farm in Somerset. While Katie dreams of finding a new job, at the moment, she’s desperate to get away from the city and her troubles there.

1 04, 2017

Review: Lucky Boy by Shanthi Sekaran

By | April 1st, 2017|Categories: Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |6 Comments

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lucky boy book coverReviewed by Jessa Larsen

Solimar Castro-Valdez is eighteen years old and has the red, white, and blue stars in her eyes of the hope life in American has to offer her. Her father pays dearly to allow her passage on the potentially perilous journey across the Mexican border and into Berkeley, California. Soli finds both love and hardship along the way and eventually arrives at her cousin’s home. Unbeknownst at the time, and completely off the charted path, Soli discovers that she is pregnant and realizes that her son, Ignacio, can anchor her in this new land, giving her an identity and purpose in an otherwise invisible and aimless life.

25 03, 2017

Review: The Last Chance Matinee by Mariah Stewart

By | March 25th, 2017|Categories: Contemporary, Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Series, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |5 Comments

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last chance matinee book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

‘Blended’ families – you know, the ‘hers’, ‘his’, and ‘ours’ type of familial organization is a fairly recent invention in this country. Especially during the last 50 years or so. But in this story you get a different kind of ‘blended’ family – three daughters of one man, with two different women, and no divorce in the middle. The three daughters meet for the first time as 30-somethings after both Moms and the Dad are all deceased. Talk about a surprise!

Allie and Des are full sisters, Cara is the singleton in the batch. Allie and Cara both had unhappy marriages; Des is still single. They meet in the attorney’s office to go over the terms of the will. All three women did know the attorney as Uncle Pete, however. It seems that Dad (Fritz Hudson) came from a wealthy family in the small town of Hidden Falls, Pennsylvania.

22 03, 2017

Blog Tour: The Roanoke Girls by Amy Engel

By | March 22nd, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |15 Comments

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roanoke girls book coverPlease join Amy Engel, author of The Roanoke Girls, as she tours the blogosphere with TLC Book Tours!

Reviewed by Kate Schefer

Lane Roanoke is weeks shy of 16 when her mother Camilla commits suicide, and Lane can’t help but feel relief. For as long as she could remember, her mother was a volatile, emotional woman who seemed to display her love for Lane in the form of hate and anger. She didn’t speak often of her childhood home, Roanoke, but when she did, she described it as a “nightmare.” Lane will not understand why until she is sent to live with her grandparents and cousin Allegra later that summer, at the family house in Kansas. Located in the country outside of Osage Flats, Roanoke is a massive estate, whose architecture was inspired by every type of house, it seems. Gran built additions after each child, and she had four daughters (who in turn had more daughters); the house, even in its mostly empty state, feels alive, like it’s pulsing with secrets.

14 03, 2017

Review: Sweet Lake by Christine Nolfi

By | March 14th, 2017|Categories: Comedy, Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Series, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , , |4 Comments

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sweet lake book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Hold on to your hats! If you don’t, it’ll surely be blown away by the eccentric batch of nutty older ladies known as the Sirens. (Nothing wrong with being a nutty older lady – I am one myself, after all) but this batch is particularly concerned (read: nosy) and active (read: fantasy-oriented), although their intentions are always good. Their motto is ‘Do kindness in secret’.

The Wayfair is a resort hotel on a lake in Mid-Southern Ohio, having been in the same family since its inception in the previous century. It has been handed down to the only child throughout its history and always a son, as the family was not very prolific until the most recent generation, which has produced a son Freddie, and a daughter Linnie.

12 02, 2017

Review: Small Admissions by Amy Poeppel

By | February 12th, 2017|Categories: Coming of Age, Genre Fiction, Humor & Entertainment, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |2 Comments

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small admissions book coverReviewed by Carrie Ardoin

When Kate Pearson graduated college and was all set to move in with her French boyfriend in Paris, it came as a hard shock when he decided that was the time to break things off with her. In the next months, she fell apart, spending most days on her sofa or bed, going days without showers, and generally being miserable. With the help of her sister and friend Chloe, she finally gets it together enough to land a job at one of New York City’s most prestigious private schools as an admissions officer.

Kate is, at first, quite overwhelmed by a job she’s sure she has no business doing. But meeting these families who would–and do–do anything to get their kids into the perfect school gives her a focus and keeps her busy. Soon Kate is highly invested in her job and slowly but surely getting her life back on track.

10 02, 2017

Review: The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell

By | February 10th, 2017|Categories: Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |4 Comments

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madwoman upstairs book coverReviewed by Nina Longfield

Samantha Whipple is a twenty-year-old first year student at Old College, Oxford. She enters school as something of a celebrity being the final descendant of the famed Bronte family line. Her first year at Oxford proves troubling since she doesn’t work well with others, tends towards her famous father’s reclusiveness, and is charged with solving a family mystery involving her father and his ancestors.

The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell is, in a sense, a late bloomer’s coming of age tale. Samantha Whipple has an attitude that is flippant, fun, annoying, and back to fun. Her cynical nature is difficult to take at times, but it becomes apparent that this is her protection.