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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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6 02, 2017

Review: Fish Wielder by J.R.R.R. Hardison

By | February 6th, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

fish wielder book coverReviewed by Caleb Shadis

Fish Wielder is a parody on all things fantasy. I mean all things. If there is a fantasy trope, it is thrown in there. If there is a literary turn of phrase, it is in there. The author even pokes fun of the book itself quite frequently. Prominent lampoonings involve Conan the Barbarian, Lord of the Rings, The Chronicles of Narnia, The Wizard of Oz, and any book with elves in it.

I felt I had to read this book since the author has three Rs in his name–J.R.R.R. Hardison. I’ve read books by most of the other authors with multiple Rs in their names…Tolkien and Martin, as well as a host with only one R.  The parody started there and didn’t stop.

5 02, 2017

Review: Home by Harlan Coben

By | February 5th, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

home by coben book coverReviewed by R.A. Donley

Superheroes generally come in two types: those with super powers (Superman, Mr. Incredible) and those who are merely exceptional humans assisted by technology (Batman.) We have Batman here, along with Robin. Winthrop Lockwood tells his part of the story in first person while Myron Bolitar is depicted in third person.

Two six-year-old boys from different families, cared for by an au pair, are kidnapped from the U.S. home of one, only to have the ransom exchange fail. Ten years later one of them is discovered in London but the initial rescue attempt by Winthrop fails. Then we’re off on a highly involved chase largely centered on finding the second child. Along the way family secrets are brought into the open and we learn the reason for the title. In addition there’s plenty of gore and a number of beautiful and/or exotic women.

3 02, 2017

Review: Trigger Yappy by Diana Orgain

By | February 3rd, 2017|Categories: Amateur Sleuths, Cozy, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense|Tags: , , , |2 Comments

Rating:

trigger yappy book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

It’s no secret that I love to read cozy mystery novels. Usually, they’re rather sensible in nature, and frequently have a strong female lead in an unusual setting. Unfortunately, this series lost its common sense somewhere along the way, and all the little ankle-biters running around must have discouraged any retrievers from at least trying to find it!  It’s entirely too cutesy-poo for me, as nearly all the characters act like hyped up grade-schoolers!

Most of the dogs have a lot more common sense than their humans! Having lived there some years ago, I realize that Californians can sometimes be a bit over the top, but really! 

3 02, 2017

Review: All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai

By | February 3rd, 2017|Categories: Action & Adventure, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Time Travel|Tags: , , , , , |12 Comments

Rating:

all our wrong todays book coverReviewed by Kate Schefer

I read All Our Wrong Todays, a book about the year 2016, in the last month of the year 2016. I am writing this review in the last week of the year, but by the time you read it, it will already be 2017, making this a tiny experiment in time travel. We can all admit that 2016 did not live up to anyone’s expectations, and you may be tempted to read this book to find solace in Mastai’s perfect, made-up 2016. But All Our Wrong Todays does you one better: it teaches you to appreciate the one we have.

Tom Barren comes not from the future, but from an alternate 2016, where all our 1950s dreams of hover cars and food synthesizers have been made possible by the 1965 invention of a machine called the Goettreider Engine.

1 02, 2017

Blog Tour & Giveaway: The Worthington Wife by Sharon Page

By | February 1st, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Giveaways, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Romance|Tags: , , |1 Comment

Rating:

worthington wife book coverPlease join Sharon Page, author of The Worthington Wife, as she tours the blogosphere with TLC Book Tours

Enter to win a $25 gift card below!

Reviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

There is much to appreciate in this story of tradition. On the one side is the continuous story of the Worthington family and the privileges they receive as part of the nobility. On the other is the effect of being literally disowned and left with no resources for even basic survival. Patrimony is responsible for both of these conditions–and it is both the strength and the weakness of England. Daughters may not inherit unless the ‘letters patent’ were originally created to make allowances for such an eventuality. This does happen, but not often enough.

1 02, 2017

Review: Liar’s Key by Carla Neggers

By | February 1st, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Romance|Tags: , , , |5 Comments

Rating:

liar's key book coverReviewed by Caleb Shadis

Liar’s Key is the first book I’ve read about Sharpe and Donovan even though it is the sixth book in the series. The good news is, you don’t really need to read the previous books to enjoy this one, but if you are really interested in the series, I would say start at the beginning. I think there is a lot of history that could make Liar’s Key even more enjoyable.

Agent Emma Sharpe works for the FBI on a special task force that deals with art crimes. Her family has also been known for doing investigations into art, since her grandfather had started an art detective agency decades before she was born. The FBI was able to convince her to come work for them.

30 01, 2017

Review: Traveling Light by Lynne Branard

By | January 30th, 2017|Categories: Humor & Entertainment, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , |4 Comments

Rating:

traveling light book coverReviewed by Jennifer Jensen

When Alissa discovers the ashes of a man named Roger Hart in a storage unit she impulsively purchases, it becomes the start of an incredible journey across the country with her three-legged dog Casserole, a teenage waitress named Blossom, and the people they meet on their travels to starting a new life.

Life is messy and there are often very few happy endings, as Lynne Branard heartbreakingly documents in Traveling Light. Alissa is easy to relate to; she’s stuck in her current existence, not really knowing what direction she wants to go. Her father wants her to take over the family business, and she’s not sure she wants it, but it is all she knows. Blossom is wise for her age, and has experienced so much more in her life than Alissa has in her own. Blossom challenges her to take risks, open closed doors, and begin an honest dialogue between herself and her family.

29 01, 2017

Review: Ill Met by Murder by Elizabeth J. Duncan

By | January 29th, 2017|Categories: Amateur Sleuths, Cozy, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Series|Tags: , , , |1 Comment

Rating:

ill met by murder book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Murder, romance, theater, doggies, humor–what more could I ask for in a mystery novel? Not much. Elizabeth J. Duncan has created a dandy premise and put it in a mostly-reasonable location, with characters you just can’t help but like and thus care about a what happens to them. The perfect ensemble, to my mind.

But if you’re not a theater-buff, not to fret, that part of it isn’t at all overdone. And neither is the romance. What there is, though, is a delightful, not-well-known location, and a cast of characters that are multi-faceted enough to keep you interested in what is happening to them.

26 01, 2017

Review: The Road to Enchantment by Kaya McLaren

By | January 26th, 2017|Categories: Coming of Age, Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |7 Comments

Rating:

road to enchantment book coverReviewed by Meg Massey

When she was a child, Willow’s father cheated on her mother and left their family in shambles. She and her mother moved to New Mexico, where she felt like an outsider among the Apache people. Her only saving grace in her mother’s strange and eccentric new life was Darrel, a young Apache boy who would become her best friend in the world.

Fast forward many years, and Willow is a musician living in Los Angeles. She finds out she’s been dumped, and that her mother has died in a tragic accident on the same horrible day. And when she returns to New Mexico to settle her mother’s affairs and sees Darrel for the first time in years, he realizes before she does that she is pregnant with her ex-boyfriend’s child.

23 01, 2017

Review: The Girl Before by JP Delaney

By | January 23rd, 2017|Categories: Literary, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense|Tags: , , , |9 Comments

Rating:

the girl before book coverReviewed by Carrie Ardoin

The Girl Before is another mystery/thriller novel in the vein of Gone Girl and The Girl on the Train. Hey, as a matter of fact, it even has the word “girl” right there in the title. While it’s true that as the events unfold, the unreliable narrator, dual storytelling points of view, and red herrings are very similar to the other books I’ve mentioned, the plot of The Girl Before enthralled me right from the start and never let go.

The book begins with two women who have suffered a traumatic event moving into a famous, yet foreboding house: Jane, who lives in the house in present day, and Emma, who was the girl that lived in the house before her.