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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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23 03, 2017

Review: The Housekeeper by Suellen Dainty

By | March 23rd, 2017|Categories: Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense|Tags: , , , , |3 Comments

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the housekeeper book coverReviewed by Jennifer Jensen

After a humiliating breakup, Anne Morgan disappears into herself and separates from the culinary world that she has worked in her entire adult life. Finding comfort in the words of celebrity blogger Emma Helmsley, Anne sees an ad that Emma is looking for a housekeeper. Though overqualified, Anne applies for the position and is welcomed into the private life of the Helmsley family.

Anne becomes intimately immersed in the private lives of each member of the Helmsley family, from having deep morning conversations with Rob that grow a little too friendly, to impersonating Emma at their son Jake’s school. The deeper that Anne falls, the more secrets that she uncovers—including some that hit a little close to home.

28 02, 2017

Review: No Other World by Rahul Mehta

By | February 28th, 2017|Categories: Coming of Age, Cultural Heritage, Gay & Lesbian, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , , |6 Comments

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no other world book coverReviewed by Kate Schefer

Kiran Shah is a little different compared to his peers in 1980s Western New York; he is Indian, obviously gay, and also somewhat geeky. His older sister Preeti is more conventional in her ways; while Indian, she has converted to Christianity (and religion will be a large influence on the family in this book), and she fits in well as a pretty cheerleader. She even dates baseball star Shawn for a period in middle school. But Kiran has his own secret relationship with Shawn, which may have contributed to Shawn’s public humiliation of Preeti when they are 12, and Kiran is only 8. The guilt from this event follows him into adulthood, and even spreads out to affect his family.

27 02, 2017

Review: Moonglow by Michael Chabon

By | February 27th, 2017|Categories: Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Urban Life|Tags: , , |9 Comments

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moonglow book coverReviewed by Alisha Churbe

Chabon’s newest book, Moonglow is a literary treat. It’s a departure from a regular novel in that it is, at least in part, biographical. The novel follows Chabon as he sits with his grandfather during his grandfather’s last days. His grandfather tells him stories about his life and Chabon is able to piece together the past based on stories he’s heard and the new stories and retellings his grandfather tells him during these final moments. The book begins with an Author’s Note that is fitting for a memoir that isn’t necessarily a memoir, but one that reads more like a novel, “I have stuck to the facts except when facts refused to conform with memory, narrative purpose, or the truth as I prefer to understand it. Wherever liberties have been taken with names, dates, places, events, and conversations, or with identities, motivations, and interrelationships of family members and historical personages, the reader is assured that they have been taken with due abandon.” This declaimer of sorts sets the reader up for one very engaging novel.

23 02, 2017

Blog Tour: The Possessions by Sara Flannery Murphy

By | February 23rd, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Ghosts, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Romance|Tags: , , , , , , |4 Comments

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the possessions book coverPlease join Sara Flannery Murphy, author of The Possessions, as she tours the blogosphere with TLC Book Tours!

Reviewed by Jennifer Jensen

Debut author Sara Flannery Murphy drew me right in with The Possessions and kept her hooks in me until the very end. The plot line of this first novel sounded similar to the canceled-too-soon TV show Dollhouse, which was a favorite of mine, so I simply had to read it. Written in first person, The Possessions is a raw account of a troubled young woman’s intriguing career as a “body” for the Elysian Society. Eurydice, as she calls herself, though this is not her true name, lends her body to clients who are looking to gain closure with loved ones who have passed on.

13 02, 2017

Review: River Road by Carol Goodman

By | February 13th, 2017|Categories: Literary, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense|Tags: , , , |6 Comments

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river road book coverReviewed by Nina Longfield

At dusk, not quite night but no longer day, Nan (Nancy) Lewis takes the curve on River Road too fast. She is blurry eyed, distracted, distraught, and she had maybe too much wine at the college faculty Christmas party. Her thoughts are on what she did not get, what she felt she was owed. Rounding the corner, a deer jumped seemingly from nowhere directly in front of her car. Nan hit her brakes too late. She hears a sickening thud as her car hits the animal then slides into the ditch.

“It was a deer,” she tells herself repeatedly. She searches but cannot find the wounded animal.

12 02, 2017

Review: Small Admissions by Amy Poeppel

By | February 12th, 2017|Categories: Coming of Age, Genre Fiction, Humor & Entertainment, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |2 Comments

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small admissions book coverReviewed by Carrie Ardoin

When Kate Pearson graduated college and was all set to move in with her French boyfriend in Paris, it came as a hard shock when he decided that was the time to break things off with her. In the next months, she fell apart, spending most days on her sofa or bed, going days without showers, and generally being miserable. With the help of her sister and friend Chloe, she finally gets it together enough to land a job at one of New York City’s most prestigious private schools as an admissions officer.

Kate is, at first, quite overwhelmed by a job she’s sure she has no business doing. But meeting these families who would–and do–do anything to get their kids into the perfect school gives her a focus and keeps her busy. Soon Kate is highly invested in her job and slowly but surely getting her life back on track.

10 02, 2017

Review: The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell

By | February 10th, 2017|Categories: Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , |3 Comments

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madwoman upstairs book coverReviewed by Nina Longfield

Samantha Whipple is a twenty-year-old first year student at Old College, Oxford. She enters school as something of a celebrity being the final descendant of the famed Bronte family line. Her first year at Oxford proves troubling since she doesn’t work well with others, tends towards her famous father’s reclusiveness, and is charged with solving a family mystery involving her father and his ancestors.

The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell is, in a sense, a late bloomer’s coming of age tale. Samantha Whipple has an attitude that is flippant, fun, annoying, and back to fun. Her cynical nature is difficult to take at times, but it becomes apparent that this is her protection.

8 02, 2017

Review: Necessary Madness by Jenn Crowell

By | February 8th, 2017|Categories: Literary, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , |2 Comments

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necessary madness book coverReviewed by Jessa Larsen

Gloria Burgess’s seemingly perfect world comes to an abrupt end when her husband of nine years dies of leukemia. Alone in London, she struggles to cope with her grief whilst trying to successfully raise her young son. She battles the temptation to sink into the same self-absorbed world that drove her own father to suicide.

In Necessary Madness, author Jenn Crowell (who also wrote Etched on Me) takes a look at the mental stability of Gloria after the death of her husband, Bill. Crowell explores the long argued nature vs. nurture–Gloria both blames her parents for her current state of being and hopes that she is not a mimicry of either parent. Whilst dealing with the grief of losing her husband, she wonders if she will be doomed to repeat the damage caused by her own father. 

8 02, 2017

Review: The Impossible Fortress by Jason Rekulak

By | February 8th, 2017|Categories: Action & Adventure, Coming of Age, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , , |2 Comments

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impossible fortress book coverReviewed by Carrie Ardoin

The year is 1987, and in the world of 14-year-old Billy, Clark, and Alf, nothing is more important than getting their hands on the recently published, scandalous pictures of Vanna White appearing in Playboy. The boys, somewhat outcasts, come up with ways to get their hands on the magazine…settling on the idea that Billy should romance the newsstand owner’s daughter so that he might gain the security code and they then would break into the shop and steal themselves a copy.

Convoluted? Yes. But there was more than one circumstance in which the characters seem to go through tremendous effort to carry out their bad decisions. They even built a scale model of the buildings so they could visualize the break-in. For 14-year-old boys, this is asking a lot.

3 02, 2017

Review: All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai

By | February 3rd, 2017|Categories: Action & Adventure, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Time Travel|Tags: , , , , , |10 Comments

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all our wrong todays book coverReviewed by Kate Schefer

I read All Our Wrong Todays, a book about the year 2016, in the last month of the year 2016. I am writing this review in the last week of the year, but by the time you read it, it will already be 2017, making this a tiny experiment in time travel. We can all admit that 2016 did not live up to anyone’s expectations, and you may be tempted to read this book to find solace in Mastai’s perfect, made-up 2016. But All Our Wrong Todays does you one better: it teaches you to appreciate the one we have.

Tom Barren comes not from the future, but from an alternate 2016, where all our 1950s dreams of hover cars and food synthesizers have been made possible by the 1965 invention of a machine called the Goettreider Engine.