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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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25 03, 2017

Review: The Last Chance Matinee by Mariah Stewart

By | March 25th, 2017|Categories: Contemporary, Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Series, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , |3 Comments

Rating:

last chance matinee book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

‘Blended’ families – you know, the ‘hers’, ‘his’, and ‘ours’ type of familial organization is a fairly recent invention in this country. Especially during the last 50 years or so. But in this story you get a different kind of ‘blended’ family – three daughters of one man, with two different women, and no divorce in the middle. The three daughters meet for the first time as 30-somethings after both Moms and the Dad are all deceased. Talk about a surprise!

Allie and Des are full sisters, Cara is the singleton in the batch. Allie and Cara both had unhappy marriages; Des is still single. They meet in the attorney’s office to go over the terms of the will. All three women did know the attorney as Uncle Pete, however. It seems that Dad (Fritz Hudson) came from a wealthy family in the small town of Hidden Falls, Pennsylvania.

14 03, 2017

Review: Sweet Lake by Christine Nolfi

By | March 14th, 2017|Categories: Comedy, Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Series, Women's Fiction|Tags: , , , , |3 Comments

Rating:

sweet lake book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Hold on to your hats! If you don’t, it’ll surely be blown away by the eccentric batch of nutty older ladies known as the Sirens. (Nothing wrong with being a nutty older lady – I am one myself, after all) but this batch is particularly concerned (read: nosy) and active (read: fantasy-oriented), although their intentions are always good. Their motto is ‘Do kindness in secret’.

The Wayfair is a resort hotel on a lake in Mid-Southern Ohio, having been in the same family since its inception in the previous century. It has been handed down to the only child throughout its history and always a son, as the family was not very prolific until the most recent generation, which has produced a son Freddie, and a daughter Linnie.

1 03, 2017

Review: Escape Clause by John Sandford

By | March 1st, 2017|Categories: Cozy, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Series|Tags: , , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

escape clause book coverReviewed by Caleb Shadis

Escape Clause is the ninth book in the Virgil Flowers series–my, how the time flies! It doesn’t seem that long ago that John Sandford only had Davenport Prey books out!  Lucas Davenport always seemed a bit grittier with in-your-face violence. Virgil Flowers is a little more laid back, though no less competent at his job (and he works/worked for Lucas). The Virgil books seem to be much more humorous and less intense.

Two Amur tigers are discovered missing from the Minnesota Zoo. It looks like a fairly well planned operation–no one saw anything and there are very few clues to follow. Virgil does help figure out how the tigers disappeared with the help of local teens who give him hints about where to look for some evidence.

26 02, 2017

Blog Tour & Giveaway: War Hawk by James Rollins

By | February 26th, 2017|Categories: Action & Adventure, Genre Fiction, Giveaways, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Series|Tags: , , , , , |5 Comments

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war hawk book coverPlease join James Rollins, author of War Hawk, as he tours the blogosphere with Partners in Crime!

14 readers will win a copy of the book–enter the contest below through March 1st!

Reviewed by Caleb Shadis

War Hawk is the second novel in the Tucker Wayne series and the whole series is a spin-off from James Rollins’ Sigma Force series. Tucker is an ex-special forces soldier and K-9 team member. Apparently, when he was discharged, he didn’t want to be separated from his partner Kane so he took him along for the ride. The Army disagreed about the arrangement, and somehow Sigma intervened (in a previous story).

25 02, 2017

Review: The Dirt on Ninth Grave by Darynda Jones

By | February 25th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Paranormal, Romance, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Series|Tags: , , , , |2 Comments

Rating:

dirt on ninth grave book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

The Dirt on Ninth Grave is the ninth book in the Charley Davidson series written by Darynda Jones. Although I haven’t read any of the other books in this series, I was pleasantly surprised with Jones’s writing style.

Jane Doe has no idea who she is or where she came from–hence the reason for the name. All she knows is that she is in New York City working in a diner, trying to remember her past. Well, that is before she realizes that she can see dead people…and to say that it surprises her would be an understatement. Pair that with everyone around her seeming to know more about her than they’re willing to admit, and things begin to get interesting.

21 02, 2017

Review: Taken by Cynthia Eden

By | February 21st, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Romance, Series|Tags: , , , |6 Comments

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taken by cynthia eden book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

Taken by Cynthia Eden is the fifth book in the LOST series (see our reviews of Torn and Shattered). With two intriguing main characters with similarly disturbing pasts, this book – like the previous four – did not disappoint.

Bailey Jones was a survivor. After all, she had survived the torture the Death Angel had put her through. She had even survived being thrown in her own grave, thought to be dead. However, nightmares of the disappearance of another of the Death Angel’s victims might just drive her crazy…well, even crazier than she already felt.

7 02, 2017

Review: The French Orphan by Michael Stolle

By | February 7th, 2017|Categories: Action & Adventure, Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Series|Tags: , , , , |6 Comments

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the french orphan book coverReviewed by R.A. Donley

It’s Three Musketeers time! Of that milieu, at least, with Richelieu as primary villain.

Teenaged Pierre, a poor orphan placed “at the famous monastery school in the city of Reims” is destined for life as a village priest or other lowly religious rank, and in the meantime is treated to corporal punishment, occasional starvation and approaches by homosexual monks who lack adequate bodily hygiene. Because, of course, that is how poor orphans were treated in France during the seventeenth century.

29 01, 2017

Review: Ill Met by Murder by Elizabeth J. Duncan

By | January 29th, 2017|Categories: Amateur Sleuths, Cozy, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Series|Tags: , , , |1 Comment

Rating:

ill met by murder book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Murder, romance, theater, doggies, humor–what more could I ask for in a mystery novel? Not much. Elizabeth J. Duncan has created a dandy premise and put it in a mostly-reasonable location, with characters you just can’t help but like and thus care about a what happens to them. The perfect ensemble, to my mind.

But if you’re not a theater-buff, not to fret, that part of it isn’t at all overdone. And neither is the romance. What there is, though, is a delightful, not-well-known location, and a cast of characters that are multi-faceted enough to keep you interested in what is happening to them.

11 01, 2017

Review: A Perilous Undertaking by Deanna Raybourn

By | January 11th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Romance, Series|Tags: , , , , |5 Comments

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perilous undertaking book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Books by Ms. Raybourn are so marvelously complex that the temptation for a reviewer is to write a long review in order to do justice to the story. This is especially difficult if the reviewer is already prone to overlong reviews. Mea culpa.

In London of 1887, eccentricity meets rigid society rules and they have a great adventure. We’re fortunate to be allowed to accompany them! This is the second  adventure of Veronica Speedwell, an emancipated woman if ever there was one – prone to dashing off to exotic places in pursuit of her trade – she’s a certified lepidopterist. For this story, however, she is back in London, sharing a cottage with a fellow scientist, Revelstoke Templeton-Vane, whom she calls Stoker. There is an attraction between them, but allowing It to grow would only complicate things, so it stays very low key.

27 10, 2016

Review: Wedding Bell Blues by Ruth Moose

By | October 27th, 2016|Categories: Amateur Sleuths, Comedy, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Romance, Series|Tags: , , , |2 Comments

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wedding bell blues book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Southern small town girl returns home after a broken romance in her second home location in the North. Okay, we can understand that. Beth McKenzie returns to Littleboro after the grandmother who’d raised her – Mama Alice – fell down the basement stairs and never recovered. Beth decided to make the family home into a B & B – The Dixie Dew – and after serious renovations (thanks to her new-found, romantic, contractor-friend Scott) she opens for business. Her devoted second in command is Ida Plum Duckett, and seemingly no conversation between them is complete without a mention of Mama Alice.

In the first book of this series, her first guest dies suddenly. Wedding Bell Blues is the second in the series, and we’re being set up for it to happen again.