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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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9 03, 2017

Review: The Mark of the King by Jocelyn Green

By | March 9th, 2017|Categories: Christian Literature & Fiction, Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Religious & Inspirational|Tags: , , |4 Comments

Rating:

mark of the king book coverReviewed by Meg Massey

Julianne Chevalier is a gifted young midwife in 18th century France. When a patient dies suddenly, Julianne is considered a murderer, and sentenced to life in prison. Longing to escape her life in prison, she agrees to be exiled to the fledgling French colony of Louisiana. In order to make the journey, however, Julianne must be married. Male and female convicts are paired together in marriage, so Julianne becomes the wife of the fiery and reckless, yet compassionate Simon LeGrange.

Once she is in the colony, Julianne is determined to try to make a new life for herself, but fears that there is no redemption for her past. She also hopes to be reunited with her brother Benjamin, whom she lost touch with after he became a soldier in Louisiana.

9 03, 2017

Review: Someone to Hold by Mary Balogh

By | March 9th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Romance|Tags: , , |2 Comments

Rating:

someone to hold book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Continuing the Westcott family story, Someone to Hold is number two of that series. The first, Someone to Love was a nearly perfect example of the traditional Regency; wonderful characters with flaws but also values; a terrific plot a bit out of the ordinary, and a true sense of ‘Regency’ as demanded by the genre’s many fans. There was wit in abundance, much poignancy and a Society setting as well as a less grand domicile. It was, to me, an entirely appropriate introduction to a newer generation of readers of the genre so beloved by many readers.

You’ll be happy to know that book two does not deviate from those rules. There is one incident with which some might find fault, but not this reader! It fit the story perfectly, and seemed an entirely appropriate behavior by the two principals. Furthermore, it precipitated the happy-ever-after ending so beloved and necessary to us all.

9 03, 2017

Review: Left at the Altar by Margaret Brownley

By | March 9th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Westerns|Tags: , , |2 Comments

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left at the altar book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

Left at the Altar, written by Margaret Brownley, isn’t your typical romance novel. Not only does it have a unique setting – a town with two time zones – but it also has a very ‘innocent’ type of romance.

In a town with two warring families, two time zones, and everyone forced to take sides, a single marriage can’t make a difference…can it?

Meg Lockwood has been friends with her fiancé Tommy Farrell since she was a child, and their union is supposed to unite the town under one time zone, finally ending the feud between their two families. However, when Tommy shows up late to his own wedding, telling Meg he no longer wants to be her husband, the whole town wonders what she did to push him away.

8 03, 2017

Review: Something Buried, Something Blue by Wendy Corsi Staub

By | March 8th, 2017|Categories: Amateur Sleuths, Cozy, Genre Fiction, Ghosts, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense|Tags: , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

something buried something blue book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

“Living in Lily Dale is like playing an endless game of telephone with a paranormal spin.” I had to laugh when I read that sentence on page 261 out of the 287 pages of Something Buried, Something Blue, as it perfectly encapsulates this entire story.

The community of Lily Dale is a real place, located In Chautauqua County, in western New York, 25 or so miles northeast of the Chautauqua Institution and 11 miles south of Dunkirk, on the shores of Lake Erie.

5 03, 2017

Review: Daughter of a Thousand Years by Amalia Carosella

By | March 5th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Mythology & Folk Tales|Tags: , , |5 Comments

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daughter of a thousand years book coverPlease join Amalia Carosella, author of Daughter of a Thousand Years, as she tours the blogosphere with Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours!

To win a $25 Amazon Gift Card & a Thor’s Hammer/Mjölnir Pewter Pendant, please enter via the Gleam form below

Reviewed by Nina Longfield

One might think two women living one thousand years apart would have little in common with each other especially when one woman is of the Viking era and the other a modern American woman. Yet Amalia Carosella skillfully interweaves the stories of Freydis and Emma throughout her novel, Daughter of a Thousand Years, so that these two women of disparate centuries are kindred spirits. Through the pages, the reader grows to know Freydis and Emma who live a thousand years apart but whose lives are in some ways parallel as both strive to live as they desire.

1 03, 2017

Review: Escape Clause by John Sandford

By | March 1st, 2017|Categories: Cozy, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Series|Tags: , , , , |4 Comments

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escape clause book coverReviewed by Caleb Shadis

Escape Clause is the ninth book in the Virgil Flowers series–my, how the time flies! It doesn’t seem that long ago that John Sandford only had Davenport Prey books out!  Lucas Davenport always seemed a bit grittier with in-your-face violence. Virgil Flowers is a little more laid back, though no less competent at his job (and he works/worked for Lucas). The Virgil books seem to be much more humorous and less intense.

Two Amur tigers are discovered missing from the Minnesota Zoo. It looks like a fairly well planned operation–no one saw anything and there are very few clues to follow. Virgil does help figure out how the tigers disappeared with the help of local teens who give him hints about where to look for some evidence.

28 02, 2017

Review: No Other World by Rahul Mehta

By | February 28th, 2017|Categories: Coming of Age, Cultural Heritage, Gay & Lesbian, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , , |6 Comments

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no other world book coverReviewed by Kate Schefer

Kiran Shah is a little different compared to his peers in 1980s Western New York; he is Indian, obviously gay, and also somewhat geeky. His older sister Preeti is more conventional in her ways; while Indian, she has converted to Christianity (and religion will be a large influence on the family in this book), and she fits in well as a pretty cheerleader. She even dates baseball star Shawn for a period in middle school. But Kiran has his own secret relationship with Shawn, which may have contributed to Shawn’s public humiliation of Preeti when they are 12, and Kiran is only 8. The guilt from this event follows him into adulthood, and even spreads out to affect his family.

27 02, 2017

Review: Moonglow by Michael Chabon

By | February 27th, 2017|Categories: Family Life, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Urban Life|Tags: , , |10 Comments

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moonglow book coverReviewed by Alisha Churbe

Chabon’s newest book, Moonglow is a literary treat. It’s a departure from a regular novel in that it is, at least in part, biographical. The novel follows Chabon as he sits with his grandfather during his grandfather’s last days. His grandfather tells him stories about his life and Chabon is able to piece together the past based on stories he’s heard and the new stories and retellings his grandfather tells him during these final moments. The book begins with an Author’s Note that is fitting for a memoir that isn’t necessarily a memoir, but one that reads more like a novel, “I have stuck to the facts except when facts refused to conform with memory, narrative purpose, or the truth as I prefer to understand it. Wherever liberties have been taken with names, dates, places, events, and conversations, or with identities, motivations, and interrelationships of family members and historical personages, the reader is assured that they have been taken with due abandon.” This declaimer of sorts sets the reader up for one very engaging novel.

26 02, 2017

Blog Tour & Giveaway: War Hawk by James Rollins

By | February 26th, 2017|Categories: Action & Adventure, Genre Fiction, Giveaways, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Series|Tags: , , , , , |5 Comments

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war hawk book coverPlease join James Rollins, author of War Hawk, as he tours the blogosphere with Partners in Crime!

14 readers will win a copy of the book–enter the contest below through March 1st!

Reviewed by Caleb Shadis

War Hawk is the second novel in the Tucker Wayne series and the whole series is a spin-off from James Rollins’ Sigma Force series. Tucker is an ex-special forces soldier and K-9 team member. Apparently, when he was discharged, he didn’t want to be separated from his partner Kane so he took him along for the ride. The Army disagreed about the arrangement, and somehow Sigma intervened (in a previous story).

25 02, 2017

Review: The Dirt on Ninth Grave by Darynda Jones

By | February 25th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Paranormal, Romance, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Series|Tags: , , , , |2 Comments

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dirt on ninth grave book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

The Dirt on Ninth Grave is the ninth book in the Charley Davidson series written by Darynda Jones. Although I haven’t read any of the other books in this series, I was pleasantly surprised with Jones’s writing style.

Jane Doe has no idea who she is or where she came from–hence the reason for the name. All she knows is that she is in New York City working in a diner, trying to remember her past. Well, that is before she realizes that she can see dead people…and to say that it surprises her would be an understatement. Pair that with everyone around her seeming to know more about her than they’re willing to admit, and things begin to get interesting.