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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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15 01, 2017

Review: The Motion of Puppets by Keith Donohue

By | January 15th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Ghosts, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Occult|Tags: , , |3 Comments

Rating:

motion of puppets book coverReviewed by Maria Tews

The Motion of Puppets by Keith Donohue was a book that I really tried to enjoy, but ultimately found too many issues with. My main one is that it lacked motion, or action, or really anything that could’ve made the lengthy 260 pages go by at least somewhat easily. The book seemed to drag on with a protracted story line that relied heavily on descriptions, but the ending left me hanging with several frustratingly unanswered questions.

Kay and Theo Harper are a newlywed couple spending the summer in the quaint Old City of Québec when Kay, afraid that someone is following her when she is returning home late from work, runs into a seemingly abandoned toy shop for safety and turns into a puppet.

9 11, 2016

Review: The Hatching by Ezekiel Boone

By | November 9th, 2016|Categories: Dystopian, Genre Fiction, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Science Fiction & Fantasy|Tags: , , , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

the hatching book coverReviewed by Jenna Arthur

When the world comes face to face with an ancient species, will it be able to survive? In The Hatching, Ezekiel Boone instantly captures our attention with the story of a hiking trip gone terribly wrong in Peru. A small group of hikers venture deep into the Peruvian forest hoping for the the trip of a lifetime, which is exactly what they get. The hikers are ravaged by a black mass, an ancient species only looking for one thing, to feed.

This ancient species of spider is ravenous, unlike anything anyone has seen before and it quickly spreads from Peru across the globe devouring everything in its path.

19 09, 2016

Review: The Dragon Round by Stephen S. Power

By | September 19th, 2016|Categories: Genre Fiction, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Series|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Rating:

the dragon round book coverReviewed by Holly Madison

I was initially drawn to The Dragon Round because of its amazing cover. It is a beautiful image of a dragon over a ship on the sea, and very fitting for this book. I will say that this is not a feel-good book. It’s an interesting book, but there is a lot of darkness in it and it often made me really depressed or disgusted. At the same time, I really enjoyed most of the book… up until the end.

At first, I had a very hard time reading it. It is written in the present tense, which I absolutely hate and had a very hard time getting used to (I did eventually get used to it). I also initially had a very hard time understanding what was really going on in the book. There were a lot of names being thrown around, and a lot of references I didn’t initially understand. I decided to continue reading it though, and am glad I did.

5 08, 2016

Review: The City of Mirrors by Justin Cronin

By | August 5th, 2016|Categories: Dystopian, Genre Fiction, Horror, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Science Fiction & Fantasy|Tags: , , , , |6 Comments

Rating:

city of mirrors book coverReviewed by Marcus Hammond

Justin Cronin’s The Passage Trilogy began in 2010 with a unique take on the ever-popular vampire genre. The first novel, The Passage, establishes a new world where blood thirsty, mindless creatures are created by the government. In The Twelve, Cronin brings civilization back from the brink of extinction. Now, in The City of Mirrors, order is restored, but a new threat unleashes havoc.

The City of Mirrors picks up several years after the events of The Twelve. Cronin delves back into the world building role he first embarked upon in The Passage to create an atmosphere of hope.

23 06, 2016

Review: The Fireman by Joe Hill

By | June 23rd, 2016|Categories: Genre Fiction, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Science Fiction & Fantasy|Tags: , , , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

the fireman book coverReviewed by Marcus Hammond

It’s hard to be unique; to find a voice that stands out in an over-saturated market, especially when one writes in genres like horror and fantasy. Joe Hill, however, has established a narrative voice that is poignant and entertaining in his new novel, The Fireman. The novel is an epic conglomeration of genres—incorporating aspects of a medical thriller, sprinkled with fantasy, horror, and even a little romance. In creating this swirling mix of genres, Hill tells a tale of human experience. He shows through his depictions of human interaction in the face of catastrophe that the human experience is one of suffering, regret, learning, and triumph.

3 05, 2016

Review: The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins

By | May 3rd, 2016|Categories: Genre Fiction, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Paranormal, Science Fiction & Fantasy|Tags: , , , |3 Comments

Rating:

library at mount char book coverReviewed by Nina Longfield

Imagine a library that contains every aspect of earthly and possibly universal knowledge from the beginnings of time to the far-flung ends of existence. Now imagine a benevolent Father figure who takes in orphans like one might take in strays. Each orphan is assigned a section of the library. Each child is set to study and become master of his or her own sector. These children are known as librarians.

The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins begins with a homecoming (of sorts). Siblings, though not blood relations, return from their respective research trips to Garrison Oaks. David, the leader of the family after Father has gone missing, summons the librarians home. From the outset, the reader is introduced to a dark mysterious world as one is introduced to Carolyn walking a

19 01, 2016

Review: Seasons of Pain by Imowen Lodestone

By | January 19th, 2016|Categories: Genre Fiction, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Paranormal, Science Fiction & Fantasy|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Rating:

seasons of pain book coverReviewed by Lauren Cannavino

Seasons Of Pain is an action-packed tale filled with horror, lust, gore and even reflections of self-discovery. Author Imowen Lodestone creates and develops an excellent complex main character Jesse that the reader will have a hard time deciding if they want to stay away from or engage with. The book may be a lot to take for readers who are generally not fans of horror fiction due to the overly descriptive, vivid details of blood and gore, but the writing is clear and the story is enjoyable enough to not have those scenes be the main focus.

Jessica or Jesse, as she is affectionately called, is a college student and stripper with a drinking problem, a no care attitude and a dark past. Expelled from her family’s witches kuven (how Lodestone chooses to

28 12, 2015

Review: The Baby by Sylvia Norman

By | December 28th, 2015|Categories: Genre Fiction, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense|Tags: , |19 Comments

Rating:

the baby book coverReviewed by Holly Madison

I hate leaving bad reviews for books, because I know that most authors put a lot of time, love, and energy into writing them. That being said, The Baby by Sylvia Norman was one of the worst things I have ever read. First off, it is not truly a book like I was expecting. It is a very short story that only took me a few minutes to read. It is hard to say too much about it due to the length of the story, but I will do my best.

I am not sure what I expected from this book. Based on the description of it, I thought that perhaps it would be a really neat idea for a horror story or even a movie–an evil baby who pretends to be normal,

28 09, 2015

Review: A Book About a Film by C. W. Schultz

By | September 28th, 2015|Categories: Genre Fiction, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense|Tags: , , |3 Comments

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a book about a film book coverReviewed by Leigh Adamkiewicz

There is a delicious rush from finding something you’re not quite meant to see. And the Found Footage genre is testament to how much money we’ll spend to pretend we’ve found something risqué. But what if you found something truly forbidden? Dangerous? You’d get the word out, sure. But what would you do if the story started to grow and change as you were telling it? What if the illusion of danger wasn’t an illusion at all?

You’d probably come up with A Book About a Film, a magnificent, multi-faceted tale about the life-changing movie you’ll never see.

The book starts off with an excellent premise. What if people who had near death experiences learned something from their time on the other side?  This was the plot of an excellent independent film called The Cornfield

31 08, 2015

Review: Those Girls by Chevy Stevens

By | August 31st, 2015|Categories: Genre Fiction, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense|Tags: , , |3 Comments

Rating:

those girls book coverReviewed by Meg Massey

The Campbell sisters have raised themselves after the death of their mother and the absence and drunken behavior of their father. When their father returns from his most recent stint at work drunk and angry, a fight with one of the girls turns ugly. Suddenly the girls must leave their home on a ranch in Canada and make new lives for themselves. But their nightmare has only just begun when their vehicle breaks down in a small town of Cash Creek.

Eighteen years later, Jess, Courtney and Dani, now Jamie, Crystal and Dallas, have struggled to forget about what happened to them in Cash Creek, and to make new lives for themselves. But a horrific experience in Crystal’s new life leads her to the self-destructive behavior of her youth, and ultimately to seek payback in Cash Creek. Only