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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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19 01, 2017

Review: The Fairest of Them All by Cathy Maxwell

By | January 19th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Romance|Tags: , |3 Comments

Rating:

fairest of them all book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

After dissolving the terms of his arranged marriage to Elin Morris because his brother, Benedict, fell in love with her, Gavin Whitridge is on the search for a suitable woman to take as his wife. However, with not wanting just a marriage of convenience, but a marriage to someone he loves and who makes his blood boil, his quest isn’t nearly as easy as it would seem–even if he is the Duke of Baynton.

Lady Charlene Blanchard is in the care of her aunt, a penniless actress and scriptwriter. Because of their struggle to survive – and because she likes the thrill – Char has been making ends meet by picking the pockets of those better off than she. However, when she is handpicked because of her beauty and bloodline as a potential bride for the Duke of Baynton, she begins to think things may turn around for her.

17 01, 2017

Blog Tour: Beyond Derrynane by Kevin O’Connell

By | January 17th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction|Tags: |3 Comments

beyond derrynane book coverPlease join Kevin O’Connell, author of Beyond Derrynane, as he tours the blogosphere with Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours!

About the book (publisher’s description)

Wed in an arranged marriage to a man nearly fifty years her senior, sixteen-year-old Eileen O’Connell goes from being one of five unmarried sisters to become the mistress of Ballyhar, the great estate of John O’Connor, one of the wealthiest and most influential men in Ireland.

When O’Connor dies suddenly seven months into their marriage, Eileen must decide whether she will fulfill her brother’s strategic goals for her family by marrying her late husband’s son.

16 01, 2017

Review: Chasing Lady Amelia by Maya Rodale

By | January 16th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Romance|Tags: , , |3 Comments

Rating:

chasing lady amelia book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

Chasing Lady Amelia, the second novel in the Keeping Up with the Cavendishes series written by Maya Rodale, is a tale of what happens when a lady decides she’s tired of acting like one, and when a gentlemen decides to let her.

Amelia Cavendish was thrown into a role that she never wanted to play when her brother, James, became a Duke. Now that they have traveled back to England from America, she not only has to wear uncomfortable dresses and shoes that pinch her toes, but she also has to act like a lady. She can no longer use crude language or explore places on her own…or really explore places at all. Instead, she’s stuck going to balls with the same boring men with the end goal of getting married–or being forced to get married.

15 01, 2017

Review: The Motion of Puppets by Keith Donohue

By | January 15th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Ghosts, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Occult|Tags: , , |3 Comments

Rating:

motion of puppets book coverReviewed by Maria Tews

The Motion of Puppets by Keith Donohue was a book that I really tried to enjoy, but ultimately found too many issues with. My main one is that it lacked motion, or action, or really anything that could’ve made the lengthy 260 pages go by at least somewhat easily. The book seemed to drag on with a protracted story line that relied heavily on descriptions, but the ending left me hanging with several frustratingly unanswered questions.

Kay and Theo Harper are a newlywed couple spending the summer in the quaint Old City of Québec when Kay, afraid that someone is following her when she is returning home late from work, runs into a seemingly abandoned toy shop for safety and turns into a puppet.

12 01, 2017

Review: Lacombe Lucien by Louis Malle & Patrick Modiano

By | January 12th, 2017|Categories: Coming of Age, Contemporary, Drama & Plays, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , , , |2 Comments

Rating:

lacombe lucien book coverReviewed by Nina Longfield

Set in Southwestern France in June 1944 during the German occupation, Lacombe Lucien is a tense work digging into the pathos of the era. The French citizens go about their lives quietly trying not to bring any attention to themselves. No one seems to know where his or her neighbor’s and, sometimes, even family loyalties lie. Lacombe Lucien is the 1974 screenplay collaboration between renown French movie producer Louis Malle and Patrick Modiano, recipient of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature. Translated into English by Sabine Destree, the screenplay is beautifully written and easily read.

11 01, 2017

Review: A Perilous Undertaking by Deanna Raybourn

By | January 11th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Romance, Series|Tags: , , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

perilous undertaking book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Books by Ms. Raybourn are so marvelously complex that the temptation for a reviewer is to write a long review in order to do justice to the story. This is especially difficult if the reviewer is already prone to overlong reviews. Mea culpa.

In London of 1887, eccentricity meets rigid society rules and they have a great adventure. We’re fortunate to be allowed to accompany them! This is the second  adventure of Veronica Speedwell, an emancipated woman if ever there was one – prone to dashing off to exotic places in pursuit of her trade – she’s a certified lepidopterist. For this story, however, she is back in London, sharing a cottage with a fellow scientist, Revelstoke Templeton-Vane, whom she calls Stoker. There is an attraction between them, but allowing It to grow would only complicate things, so it stays very low key.

10 01, 2017

Review: Wangs vs. the World by Jade Chang

By | January 10th, 2017|Categories: Asian American, Coming of Age, Genre Fiction, Humor & Entertainment, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Satire|Tags: , , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

wangs vs the world book coverReviewed by Alisha Churbe

Jade Chang’s novel, Wangs vs. the World is highly entertaining. It is a portrait of a family complete with all of their similarities and their differences. She shows them as they come together and also when they fall apart. The novel is a very quick read. Chang’s prose is energetic and flows flawlessly. She peppers in thoughts about immigration and politics but it is not heavy-handed and fits within the confines of the novel well. The thoughts propel the story to its conclusion.

Charles Wang has lost everything. He once had everything–fancy cars, a lucrative business, many factories, enough money to be comfortable and then some. He has three children, Grace, Andrew and Saina. He’s married to his second wife, Barbra.  His first wife was killed in an accident six months after his youngest daughter, Grace, was born.

9 01, 2017

Review: The Most Dangerous Place on Earth by Lindsey Lee Johnson

By | January 9th, 2017|Categories: Coming of Age, Genre Fiction, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense|Tags: , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

most dangerous place on earth book coverReviewed by Carrie Ardoin

It’s been more than ten years since I was in high school, but I do have a younger brother who’s still there…and I really am thankful that he doesn’t have the attitude of any of the characters in this book. Honestly, not a single character in The Most Dangerous Place on Earth was likable. I’m not sure if that’s what the author intended, but that’s how I felt.

The novel tells the somewhat disjointed story of a group of kids who have grown up and gone to school together since their elementary years. In eighth grade, something tragically avoidable (and very maddening to read about) happened to one of their classmates, and though you’d think it would affect all of the kids’ lives pretty deeply, it doesn’t.

7 01, 2017

Review: Confessions of a Wedding Musician Mom by Jennifer McCoy Blaske

By | January 7th, 2017|Categories: Comedy, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , |4 Comments

Rating:

wedding musician mom book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

I wanted to like Confessions of a Wedding Musician Mom. Really, I did. I love classical music and it has been a major part of my long life. I knew I was in trouble, however, on page 15 as the female protagonist opened her ‘yellow Schemer edition of Chopin’s preludes’. Every piano or other music student would immediately recognize a Schirmer’s Library edition, with the black scroll work on its yellow cover.

Against my better judgement, I persisted in continuing to read. I actually  made it to page 63 of 189, before abandoning the project. What an abysmal mess! Eegads. 

30 12, 2016

Blog Tour: The Golden Son by Shilpi Somaya Gowda

By | December 30th, 2016|Categories: Coming of Age, Cultural Heritage, Genre Fiction, Historical, Literary, Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , , |6 Comments

Rating:

the golden son book coverPlease join Shilpi Somaya Gowda, author of The Golden Son, as she tours the blogosphere with TLC Book Tours!

Reviewed by Nina Longfield

In a rural province of India, young Anil Patel witnesses secondhand the miracle of modern medicine when a traveling clinic restores health to a baby girl and faith within the family. Anil is then determined to enter the medical field with his father’s blessings. Anil’s father sees medicine as an honorable calling and encourages his son’s pursuit giving him permission to remain home away from the fields so he can study, which Anil does morning to night.