About Me:

Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

Want to join our review team? Email me!

Blog Button

Blog Button

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

19 01, 2017

Review: The Fairest of Them All by Cathy Maxwell

By | January 19th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Romance|Tags: , |3 Comments

Rating:

fairest of them all book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

After dissolving the terms of his arranged marriage to Elin Morris because his brother, Benedict, fell in love with her, Gavin Whitridge is on the search for a suitable woman to take as his wife. However, with not wanting just a marriage of convenience, but a marriage to someone he loves and who makes his blood boil, his quest isn’t nearly as easy as it would seem–even if he is the Duke of Baynton.

Lady Charlene Blanchard is in the care of her aunt, a penniless actress and scriptwriter. Because of their struggle to survive – and because she likes the thrill – Char has been making ends meet by picking the pockets of those better off than she. However, when she is handpicked because of her beauty and bloodline as a potential bride for the Duke of Baynton, she begins to think things may turn around for her.

17 01, 2017

Blog Tour: Beyond Derrynane by Kevin O’Connell

By | January 17th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction|Tags: |3 Comments

beyond derrynane book coverPlease join Kevin O’Connell, author of Beyond Derrynane, as he tours the blogosphere with Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours!

About the book (publisher’s description)

Wed in an arranged marriage to a man nearly fifty years her senior, sixteen-year-old Eileen O’Connell goes from being one of five unmarried sisters to become the mistress of Ballyhar, the great estate of John O’Connor, one of the wealthiest and most influential men in Ireland.

When O’Connor dies suddenly seven months into their marriage, Eileen must decide whether she will fulfill her brother’s strategic goals for her family by marrying her late husband’s son.

16 01, 2017

Review: Stalking Ground by Margaret Mizushima

By | January 16th, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense|Tags: , , , |3 Comments

Rating:

stalking ground book coverReviewed by Jenna Arthur

When Mattie and her K9 partner Robo are called back early from routine training, Mattie fears the worst. Adrienne, deputy Ken Brody’s girlfriend, has mysteriously gone missing, leaving no note or trace behind her. Brody fears the worst and so does Mattie.

Adrienne, a very dependable woman, never left without first telling someone. She was supposed to have an appointment with a local vet, Cole, to teach his daughter about equine massage but never showed up. This was completely out of character for her and her disappearance quickly sent the entire town into a small state of panic.

16 01, 2017

Review: Chasing Lady Amelia by Maya Rodale

By | January 16th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Romance|Tags: , , |3 Comments

Rating:

chasing lady amelia book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

Chasing Lady Amelia, the second novel in the Keeping Up with the Cavendishes series written by Maya Rodale, is a tale of what happens when a lady decides she’s tired of acting like one, and when a gentlemen decides to let her.

Amelia Cavendish was thrown into a role that she never wanted to play when her brother, James, became a Duke. Now that they have traveled back to England from America, she not only has to wear uncomfortable dresses and shoes that pinch her toes, but she also has to act like a lady. She can no longer use crude language or explore places on her own…or really explore places at all. Instead, she’s stuck going to balls with the same boring men with the end goal of getting married–or being forced to get married.

15 01, 2017

Review: The Motion of Puppets by Keith Donohue

By | January 15th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Ghosts, Horror, Literature & Fiction, Occult|Tags: , , |3 Comments

Rating:

motion of puppets book coverReviewed by Maria Tews

The Motion of Puppets by Keith Donohue was a book that I really tried to enjoy, but ultimately found too many issues with. My main one is that it lacked motion, or action, or really anything that could’ve made the lengthy 260 pages go by at least somewhat easily. The book seemed to drag on with a protracted story line that relied heavily on descriptions, but the ending left me hanging with several frustratingly unanswered questions.

Kay and Theo Harper are a newlywed couple spending the summer in the quaint Old City of Québec when Kay, afraid that someone is following her when she is returning home late from work, runs into a seemingly abandoned toy shop for safety and turns into a puppet.

15 01, 2017

Review: Baggage Check by M.J. Pullen

By | January 15th, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction|Tags: , |3 Comments

Rating:

baggage check book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

Baggage Check, the third novel in the Marriage Pact series written by M.J. Pullen, is a charming novel about frenemy Rebecca’s journey to happily-ever-after.

Rebecca, 35, is surrounded by happy couples at work and in her circle of friends. Jake, her crush, has just married her friend Marci, and with no idea how to move on, she has made a comfortable life as a flight attendant. With the ability to travel to exotic locations, one would think Rebecca’s life would be full of adventure; however, she spends most of her time off in different hotel rooms around the world much to her friends’ dismay.

12 01, 2017

Review: French Rhapsody by Antoine Laurain

By | January 12th, 2017|Categories: Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

french rhapsody book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

This quaint and charming book is almost more of what it isn’t than what it is! French Rhapsody sort of meanders along, very nicely, not rushed at all, and you can’t put it down! It tells an engrossing story of what happened (or – actually — didn’t happen) to a burgeoning rock group in Paris in 1983. They made a cassette of their music and with high hopes, sent it off to a recording company. And heard nothing. Not one word, not even ‘don’t call us, we’ll call you’ (or whatever the French for that saying might be.)

And then one day, 33 years later, the response to that letter suddenly appeared. It contained an invitation to visit the company to discuss the future. It was no one’s fault really – this delay. The letter fell down behind a desk, where it stayed until that post office was being renovated. At least the Post Office did then forward the letter with apologies for the delay.

12 01, 2017

Review: Lacombe Lucien by Louis Malle & Patrick Modiano

By | January 12th, 2017|Categories: Coming of Age, Contemporary, Drama & Plays, Genre Fiction, Literature & Fiction|Tags: , , , , |2 Comments

Rating:

lacombe lucien book coverReviewed by Nina Longfield

Set in Southwestern France in June 1944 during the German occupation, Lacombe Lucien is a tense work digging into the pathos of the era. The French citizens go about their lives quietly trying not to bring any attention to themselves. No one seems to know where his or her neighbor’s and, sometimes, even family loyalties lie. Lacombe Lucien is the 1974 screenplay collaboration between renown French movie producer Louis Malle and Patrick Modiano, recipient of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature. Translated into English by Sabine Destree, the screenplay is beautifully written and easily read.

11 01, 2017

Review: A Perilous Undertaking by Deanna Raybourn

By | January 11th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Romance, Series|Tags: , , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

perilous undertaking book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Books by Ms. Raybourn are so marvelously complex that the temptation for a reviewer is to write a long review in order to do justice to the story. This is especially difficult if the reviewer is already prone to overlong reviews. Mea culpa.

In London of 1887, eccentricity meets rigid society rules and they have a great adventure. We’re fortunate to be allowed to accompany them! This is the second  adventure of Veronica Speedwell, an emancipated woman if ever there was one – prone to dashing off to exotic places in pursuit of her trade – she’s a certified lepidopterist. For this story, however, she is back in London, sharing a cottage with a fellow scientist, Revelstoke Templeton-Vane, whom she calls Stoker. There is an attraction between them, but allowing It to grow would only complicate things, so it stays very low key.

10 01, 2017

Review: Wangs vs. the World by Jade Chang

By | January 10th, 2017|Categories: Asian American, Coming of Age, Genre Fiction, Humor & Entertainment, Literary, Literature & Fiction, Satire|Tags: , , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

wangs vs the world book coverReviewed by Alisha Churbe

Jade Chang’s novel, Wangs vs. the World is highly entertaining. It is a portrait of a family complete with all of their similarities and their differences. She shows them as they come together and also when they fall apart. The novel is a very quick read. Chang’s prose is energetic and flows flawlessly. She peppers in thoughts about immigration and politics but it is not heavy-handed and fits within the confines of the novel well. The thoughts propel the story to its conclusion.

Charles Wang has lost everything. He once had everything–fancy cars, a lucrative business, many factories, enough money to be comfortable and then some. He has three children, Grace, Andrew and Saina. He’s married to his second wife, Barbra.  His first wife was killed in an accident six months after his youngest daughter, Grace, was born.