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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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27 03, 2017

Review: A Crown of Wishes by Roshani Chokshi

By | March 27th, 2017|Categories: Children's Books, Myths & Legends, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Series, Young Adult|Tags: , , , , |2 Comments

Rating:

crown of wishes book coverReviewed by Richard Wisniewski

Wishes. Hopes. Desires. They can either drive one to the pinnacle of success or the abyss of demise. Roshani Chokshi transformed the traditions and beliefs behind wishes, hopes and desires to what is bound to become a New York Times bestseller. Crown of Wishes is the second installment in a series, and Chokshi truly flexed her writing capabilities from the very first page.

The story is broken out into chapters narrated by different characters. This provides for quite a unique vantage point later in the book. In all honesty, this was one of my favorite aspects of the book and has become my preferred way to tell a story. 

21 03, 2017

Review: The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco

By | March 21st, 2017|Categories: Adventures & Thrillers, Children's Books, Paranormal, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Wizards & Witches, Young Adult|Tags: , , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

bone witch book coverReviewed by Sarah Lelonek

I knew I would like this book. The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco intrigued me with its descriptive story telling and unique characters. I fell in love with the world the author created, and wanted to know more about every character.

Tea lived in a small town–a town that is part of a magical world where only certain types of magic are warmly regarded. When Tea accidentally summons her brother back from the dead, she has to come to terms with being a “bone witch” and a wielder of the dark arts. As Tea begins her training as an asha, a wielder of strong magic, she learns all magic is not equal and some is prosecuted against–even if she and the few other bone witches are all that stands between life and death for her world.

19 03, 2017

Review: We Are Still Tornadoes by Michael Kun & Susan Mullen

By | March 19th, 2017|Categories: Children's Books, Dating & Sex, Death & Dying, Family, Friendships, Love & Romance, Social Issues, Young Adult|Tags: , , , , , , |2 Comments

Rating:

we are still tornadoes book coverReviewed by Alisha Churbe

We Are Still Tornadoes is written entirely in letters. It is classified as a Young Adult read, but hits on the older end of the spectrum, as the characters have just begun their first year of college after high school, on the edge of turning 19 years old. The novel is set in the early 1980s, making the letter style normal, as the characters do not have much access to technology.

The book is just short of 300 pages, but there is plenty of white space due to the letter format. There is plenty packed into the letters filling out the story nicely. The story is entirely told with letters to and from two characters: Cath and Scott.

16 03, 2017

Review: Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow

By | March 16th, 2017|Categories: Children's Books, Depression & Mental Illness, Emotions & Feelings, Physical & Emotional Abuse, Social Issues, Suicide, Young Adult|Tags: , , , , , , |3 Comments

Rating:

girl in pieces book coverReviewed by Alexander Morrison

Charlotte Davis was a homeless addict who dealt with her pain by cutting herself, until that no longer sufficed and she tried to commit suicide. Committed to a psychiatric facility to heal and to try and learn to deal with some of her issues, Charlie seems to be recovering slowly, but the facility is expensive and what little family she has left in the world can’t support it anymore, so she’s sent away. A friend in Arizona takes her in, but that’s only the start of her journey, as the wounds of her past are never far from the surface. She has to try and hold down a job, find a place to live, navigate romantic drama, and most importantly–not cut herself. But the stress of not having enough money and of bad relationships with damaged people push her to the edge. Can she survive, or is Charlie too wounded to allow herself to heal?

10 03, 2017

Review: A List of Cages by Robin Roe

By | March 10th, 2017|Categories: Children's Books, Family, Friendships, Physical & Emotional Abuse, Young Adult|Tags: , , , , , |4 Comments

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a list of cages book coverReviewed by Kate Schefer

Adam Blake is having the best senior year. He’s surrounded by good friends, does well in all his classes despite his ADHD, and even landed an elective period as the school counselor’s assistant, which basically means texting his friends and roaming the halls. He’s got this whole thing figured out, and everyone believes him; he’s irrepressibly effervescent (partly due to the ADHD and partly due to his positive demeanor) and never lets anything discourage him. But one month into the school year, Dr. Whitlock tells him to go find a student who’s been avoiding her, a freshman named Julian. The same Julian that Adam and his mother had fostered five years earlier, before his uncle Russell took custody of him and cut off all contact.

19 02, 2017

Review: I’m Not your Manic Pixie Dream Girl by Gretchen McNeil

By | February 19th, 2017|Categories: Children's Books, Dating & Sex, Friendships, Love & Romance, Social Issues, Young Adult|Tags: , , , , |3 Comments

Rating:

manic pixie dream girl book coverReviewed by Lauren Cannavino

Beatrice Giovanni and her best friends, Spencer and Gabe, have been the targets of bullies all throughout high school. Starting their senior year, Bea decides that enough is enough and decides to find a way to reverse the bullying trend. Armed with newly discovered confidence thanks to her new boyfriend Jesse and fresh with the promise of a new start at her dream school MIT, Bea devises a plan that she feels is foolproof. Known not so affectionately throughout campus as “Math Girl”, Bea calculates the ultimate formula, one that will cultivate popularity for her and her friends.

16 02, 2017

Review: Wayfarer by Alexandra Bracken

By | February 16th, 2017|Categories: Adventures & Thrillers, Children's Books, Love & Romance, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Series, Young Adult|Tags: , , , , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

wayfarer book coverReviewed by Christen Krumm

Every once in a while, you are fortunate enough to come across a book – or a book series – that is so captivating, you do not want it to end. Alexandra Bracken’s Passenger series has done this to me.

Wayfarer, just like its predecessor, is jammed packed full of action, excitement, romance, and has enough twists and turns to keep you guessing until the very end. It picks up where Passenger left off (and is one of those sequels that if you have not read the first book, you will be completely and hopelessly lost). Nicholas and Etta have been split up and both are trying to reach the other through the bonds of time and space. I knew how I wanted the book to end, but the more I read, the more my heart clenched wondering if it was even going to be possible. Somehow, in the end, working her brilliant magic, Bracken is able to bring the story, and series, to a close in the most satisfying way.

10 02, 2017

Review: RoseBlood by A. G. Howard

By | February 10th, 2017|Categories: Children's Books, Love & Romance, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Young Adult|Tags: , , , , , |3 Comments

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roseblood book coverReviewed by Sarah Lelonek

Some books speak to me. I can relate with every character and I get sucked into the world the author creates. However, for many reasons, I was not enthralled with RoseBlood by A. G. Howard. In fact, I felt like it was a chore to even finish the book.

The novel is a modern day retelling of the Phantom of the Opera. Rune, a siren of sorts, has no idea why music moves her like it does. She feels like melodies, especially operas, need to be “purged” from her body within hours of being heard. After her father’s death and her mother’s decision to remarry, Rune is sent to a school for opera and theater in France. The school inhabits an old opera house, where it is rumored the original phantom of the opera resides. Except it’s

4 02, 2017

Review: Supremacy by Christin Lee

By | February 4th, 2017|Categories: Children's Books, Love & Romance, Paranormal, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Series, Young Adult|Tags: , , , , , |4 Comments

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supremacy book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

Supremacy, the first in a series written by Christin Lee, is a fantasy young adult novel with a magical twist.

Kate Parker is a seemingly normal teenager. She’s on the swim team, has two very different best friends, is very close with her family, and loves animals.

However, after meeting Lucas – a mysterious exchange student with pain in the depths of his brown eyes – her life becomes anything but normal. As she finds out more and more about Lucas and his past, she realizes that she may have gotten more than she bargained for the day she fixed his motorcycle and their connection formed.

19 01, 2017

Review: One Half from the East by Nadia Hashimi

By | January 19th, 2017|Categories: Children's Books, Coming of Age, Young Adult|Tags: , , |3 Comments

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one half from the east book coverReviewed by Benish Khan

One Half from the East by Nadia Hashimi is an emotional coming of age children’s novel. The protagonist Obayda’s family has issues. Her father has lost one of his legs in a bomb explosion, forcing their family to move away from their home to a small village in Kabul. Her father almost never leaves his room. One day, Obayda’s aunt has an idea to bring the family luck. She dresses Obayda as a boy, a bacha posh. Now she is Obayd. Soon, she meets another bacha posh, and it changes everything. They’re free to explore the village on their own without any restrictions. However, their transformation won’t last forever, and they must figure out a way to make their freedom last.