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Welcome! The ultimate luxury for me is curling up with a good book and a warm blanket. The next best thing is reviewing books and sharing them with others.

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So far Vera has created 5010 blog entries.
10 03, 2017

Review: The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking

By | March 10th, 2017|Categories: Happiness, Health, Mind, & Body, Nonfiction, Personal Health, Religion & Spirituality, Self-Help|Tags: , , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

The Little Book of Hygge book coverReviewed by Richard Wisniewski

Happiness. That word brings forth millions upon millions of thoughts within seconds. When you ask people what the meaning of life may be to them, many say happiness. If you ask them for their personal goals, they say happiness. Everyone, to some degree, is pointing towards happiness. With that being said, every year, numerous reports deliver research on the happiest countries in the world. Each and every year, the Danes end up taking the cake. (If you read this book, you will get the pun).

The Little Book of Hygge is quite the fascinating book as it offers great insight into the cultural belief system of the Danish people.

10 03, 2017

January and February Monthly Contest Winners

By | March 10th, 2017|Categories: Giveaways, Monthly Contest|Tags: |4 Comments

stack of books As promised, every month I give away a prize of their choice to the most creative/prolific contributor to Luxury Reading.

Since I was remiss in naming the January winner, our January and February winners are…

TechEditor and Richard W.!

Kudos to everyone for your great comments! Please post a comment here with your selection!

9 03, 2017

Review: The Mark of the King by Jocelyn Green

By | March 9th, 2017|Categories: Christian Literature & Fiction, Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Religious & Inspirational|Tags: , , |3 Comments

Rating:

mark of the king book coverReviewed by Meg Massey

Julianne Chevalier is a gifted young midwife in 18th century France. When a patient dies suddenly, Julianne is considered a murderer, and sentenced to life in prison. Longing to escape her life in prison, she agrees to be exiled to the fledgling French colony of Louisiana. In order to make the journey, however, Julianne must be married. Male and female convicts are paired together in marriage, so Julianne becomes the wife of the fiery and reckless, yet compassionate Simon LeGrange.

Once she is in the colony, Julianne is determined to try to make a new life for herself, but fears that there is no redemption for her past. She also hopes to be reunited with her brother Benjamin, whom she lost touch with after he became a soldier in Louisiana.

9 03, 2017

Review: Someone to Hold by Mary Balogh

By | March 9th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Romance|Tags: , , |2 Comments

Rating:

someone to hold book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

Continuing the Westcott family story, Someone to Hold is number two of that series. The first, Someone to Love was a nearly perfect example of the traditional Regency; wonderful characters with flaws but also values; a terrific plot a bit out of the ordinary, and a true sense of ‘Regency’ as demanded by the genre’s many fans. There was wit in abundance, much poignancy and a Society setting as well as a less grand domicile. It was, to me, an entirely appropriate introduction to a newer generation of readers of the genre so beloved by many readers.

You’ll be happy to know that book two does not deviate from those rules. There is one incident with which some might find fault, but not this reader! It fit the story perfectly, and seemed an entirely appropriate behavior by the two principals. Furthermore, it precipitated the happy-ever-after ending so beloved and necessary to us all.

9 03, 2017

Review: Left at the Altar by Margaret Brownley

By | March 9th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Westerns|Tags: , , |2 Comments

Rating:

left at the altar book coverReviewed by Bethany Kelly

Left at the Altar, written by Margaret Brownley, isn’t your typical romance novel. Not only does it have a unique setting – a town with two time zones – but it also has a very ‘innocent’ type of romance.

In a town with two warring families, two time zones, and everyone forced to take sides, a single marriage can’t make a difference…can it?

Meg Lockwood has been friends with her fiancé Tommy Farrell since she was a child, and their union is supposed to unite the town under one time zone, finally ending the feud between their two families. However, when Tommy shows up late to his own wedding, telling Meg he no longer wants to be her husband, the whole town wonders what she did to push him away.

8 03, 2017

Review: Something Buried, Something Blue by Wendy Corsi Staub

By | March 8th, 2017|Categories: Amateur Sleuths, Cozy, Genre Fiction, Ghosts, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense|Tags: , , , |4 Comments

Rating:

something buried something blue book coverReviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

“Living in Lily Dale is like playing an endless game of telephone with a paranormal spin.” I had to laugh when I read that sentence on page 261 out of the 287 pages of Something Buried, Something Blue, as it perfectly encapsulates this entire story.

The community of Lily Dale is a real place, located In Chautauqua County, in western New York, 25 or so miles northeast of the Chautauqua Institution and 11 miles south of Dunkirk, on the shores of Lake Erie.

7 03, 2017

Review: Drop In by Sara Harvey Yao

By | March 7th, 2017|Categories: Business & Investing, Health, Mind, & Body, Management & Leadership, Nonfiction, Self-Help|Tags: , , |2 Comments

Rating:

drop in book coverReviewed by Richard Wisniewski

In 2017, social conditioning has programmed a society into a state of complete distraction. While many may have resistance to this notion, it’s true. In so many cases, people have complicated their lives to a place where complications, complexities, busyness, and stress seem normal. In fact, for some corrupt reason, people actually value their self-worth as a worker by how much stress they have. And these complexities of life and the constant state of busyness have caused people to, by default, stay in auto-pilot mode, as Sara Harvey Yao describes. Drop In: Lead with Deeper Presence and Courage is the perfect book for anyone seeking to truly focus on the here and now. 

7 03, 2017

Review: Mincemeat by Leonardo Lucarelli

By | March 7th, 2017|Categories: Cooking, Food, Wine, Memoirs, Nonfiction|Tags: , |3 Comments

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mincemeat book coverReviewed by Kate Schefer

Leonardo Lucarelli has always liked to cook. His father was an exceptional cook, but passed away young. His mother tried, but could never make anything that transcended the merely edible. As a teen, Leo spent free afternoons at home cooking for himself and friends; he realized he was good, but never considered it more than a useful skill. When he received a scholarship to study in Rome, he jumped at the opportunity to leave his home in the country; when that scholarship covered little more than his books, he walked into a restaurant kitchen and asked for a job. So began “the education of an Italian chef,” the subtitle of Lucarelli’s illuminating autobiography, Mincemeat.

6 03, 2017

Review: Gizelle’s Bucket List by Lauren Fern Watt

By | March 6th, 2017|Categories: Animals, Memoirs, Nonfiction, Travel|Tags: , , |3 Comments

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gizelle's bucket list book coverReviewed by Sarah Dalton

Gizelle’s Bucket List was a fun, fast read. I laughed, a lot. OK, right up until I needed tissues and a couple days away from the book for my mental health. The story centers on Lauren (Fernie) and Gizelle, her 160 pound Mastiff. Woven around this central pillar are ribbons of side story about family dynamics, friendships, adventure, boyfriends, love (or at least like), loss, self-discovery, and slobber. Lots and lots of slobber. Actually, there is really only one story about slobber. It’s not bad.

We get to be with Fernie when, at the behest of her Mother, she finds, falls in love with, and brings home Gizelle. Leave to get doughnuts, come home with a giant breed puppy.

5 03, 2017

Review: Daughter of a Thousand Years by Amalia Carosella

By | March 5th, 2017|Categories: Genre Fiction, Historical, Literature & Fiction, Mythology & Folk Tales|Tags: , , |5 Comments

Rating:

daughter of a thousand years book coverPlease join Amalia Carosella, author of Daughter of a Thousand Years, as she tours the blogosphere with Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours!

To win a $25 Amazon Gift Card & a Thor’s Hammer/Mjölnir Pewter Pendant, please enter via the Gleam form below

Reviewed by Nina Longfield

One might think two women living one thousand years apart would have little in common with each other especially when one woman is of the Viking era and the other a modern American woman. Yet Amalia Carosella skillfully interweaves the stories of Freydis and Emma throughout her novel, Daughter of a Thousand Years, so that these two women of disparate centuries are kindred spirits. Through the pages, the reader grows to know Freydis and Emma who live a thousand years apart but whose lives are in some ways parallel as both strive to live as they desire.