Rating:

9781782640028Reviewed by Marcus Hammond

On three separate continents, unsuspecting people go about their daily lives. They take their families on vacations, to soccer matches, and go about their days like normal. As they enjoy the normalcy of the day a sinister plot begins to unfold. Angelguard by Ian Acheson begins with three devastating bomb attacks on highly populated areas of London, Sydney, and Los Angeles and slowly develops into an inspirational and spiritual action/mystery that shows the power prayer can have on even the worst of situations.

Leopold Grosch, a multi-billionaire industrialist, hatches a plot to bring the world to its knees through a series of overwhelmingly violent terrorist attacks. He, however, could not foresee the role a group of survivors from the first three bombings and their angelic guardians would have in foiling his plans for global dominance.

The plot of the novel places the power of faith and prayer in direct contrast to the evil that is perpetrated throughout the world. Jack Haines, the main protagonist of the story loses several family members in one of the first terrorist attacks. He, through the power of his own faith in God and his mother’s dedicated prayers, finds the strength to move forward with his life. In doing so, he finds himself uncovering Grosch’s final plot to attack the G8 Summit in Berlin, Germany.

The novel has a good message as seen through the various characters’ selflessness and faith that God will provide for them. The added supernatural element that is supplied by having an unseen world of angels and demons fighting each other in support of the major characters is also entertaining. The two biggest issues with this novel, which can be found in the forced and slowly developing dialogue and Acheson’s attempt to keep the story fairly clean, while trying to describe pure evil, completely derail the enjoyment. As evidence of these two issues, the good characters are often found committed to (at times) lengthy prayers for help and expressing themselves through exclamations of “gosh, golly, gee!”, while the evil characters portray a desire to murder, rape, and in one specific section demean a character through the use of a racial epithet. This stark and unnecessary contrast feels forced and unnatural in a novel about the power and inspiration that prayer and faith can have in one’s life. Overall, I enjoyed small parts of this novel, but felt the dialogue and extreme characterizations of evil completely derailed the intended objective.

Rating: ★★☆☆☆ 

After obtaining a Masters in Liberal Arts and Literature Marcus has dedicated most of his time to teaching English Composition for a community college in the Midwest. In his down time, he spends time avidly reading an eclectic selection of books and doing freelance writing whenever he gets the chance. He lives in Kansas with his wife.

Review copy was provided free of any obligation by Ian Acheson. No monetary or any other form of compensation was received.