Rating:

amy snow book coverReviewed by Meredith Kelly

I just loved this book! Amy Snow is set in the Victorian Age of Great Britain, an era that I love for its grandiosity and refinement. I knew from the start that this would be an exceptional book and it surely did not let me down.

As a young girl of eight, Aurelia Vennaway, heir and only child of the wealthy Vennaway family, went out on a cold January day to play in the snow that had fallen the night before. While outside, she came upon a naked baby just lying in the snow.

Aurelia was a willful, spoiled and stubborn child. Despite family pressure, she threw a tantrum and was told she could keep the child. Aurelia liked the name Amy and because she was found in the snow, the baby was given the last name of Snow.

The only rule Aurelia’s family had was that the child would have to be out of their sight and never mentioned in their presence. A crib was made out of a basket and Amy Snow slept in the kitchen for warmth.

The few times Aurelia’s parents realized that Amy was around she was severely reprimanded and made to feel worthless. Amy had a Dickensian childhood and the only person who paid attention or loved her was Aurelia.

When Aurelia developed a failing heart, still stubborn and used to getting her way, she decided to see the rest of Great Britain in three months time. The trip lasted a year.

Soon came a tragic and devastating shock that was both stunning and uplifting, and sent all sort of complicated emotions through my mind. I know that you too would be captivated by this novel.

As I mentioned before, I loved the time period but more than that, I loved the quirky and odd, yet lovable people that Amy met on her quest for the big secret. And for the life that Amy Snow was always hoping for.


Meredith has been an avid reader since childhood and loves to talk about books. A bit of a Luddite, she has only recently become acquainted with E-Reading and online book reviews. She finds exposure to such a wide audience of opinion on books fascinating.

Review copy was provided free of any obligation by Simon & Schuster. No monetary or any other form of compensation was received.